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Yaroslav II Vsevolodovich Rurik of Vladimir, Prince of Pereyaslavl, Prince of Pereyaslavl-Zalessky, Prince of Novgorod, Grand Prince of Kiev, Grand Prince of Vladimir, was born 8 February 1191 to Vsevolod III Yuryevich of Vladimir (1154-1212) and Mariya Shvarnovna of Ossetia (1155-1205) and died 30 September 1249 in Karakorum of poisoning. He married NN Yuryevna of Cumania (c1192-c1212) circa 1205 JL . He married Rostislava Mstislavna of Smolensk (c1202-1244) 1214 JL . He married Feodosya Igoryevna of Ryazan (1194-1244) 1218 JL . Ancestors are from Russia, Ukraine, Sweden, the Byzantine Empire.


Yaroslav II (Russian: Яросла́в II Все́володович), Christian name Fyodor (Theodor - Феодо́р) (February 8, 1191 – September 30, 1246) Prince of Pereyaslavl (1200–1206), Prince of Pereyaslavl-Zalessky (1212— 1238), Grand Prince of Kiev (1236-1238, 1243-1246), Grand Prince of Vladimir (1238-1246), Prince of Novgorod (1215, 1221-1223, 1226-1229, 1231-1236). He was the Grand Prince of Vladimir who helped to restore his country and capital after the Mongol invasion of Russia.

Prince of Pereyaslavl-Zalessky

Yaroslav was the fourth son of Vsevolod Yuryevich of Vladimir and Mariya Shvarnovna.

In 1200, he was sent by his father to rule the town of Pereyaslavl near the Kypchak steppes. Six years later, he was summoned by galichian boyars to rule their city but could not effectively claim the throne. Thereupon he was sent to take Ryazan, but the stubborn opposition of the inhabitants led to the city being burnt. In 1209, Vsevolod sent Yaroslav to oppose Mstislav Mstislavich the Bold in Novgorod. After several battles, the two princes made peace, whereby Yaroslav married Mstislav's daughter Rostislava Mstislavna.

Upon his deathbed, Vsevolod Yuryevich bequeathed Yaroslav the Principality of Pereyaslavl-Zalessky. In the conflict between his elder brothers Konstantin and Yuri, Yaroslav supported the latter. In 1215, he accepted the offer of the Novgorodians to become their prince but, desiring revenge for their former treachery, captured Torzhok and blocked its supplies of grain to Novgorod. Several months later, he was defeated by his father-in-law in the Battle of Lipitsa and had to retreat to Pereyaslavl-Zalessky]; a helmet that he lost during the battle would be retrieved by archaeologists in 1808.

Yaroslav II helmet

A helmet lost by Yaroslav in the aftermath of the Battle of Lipitsa and retrieved by a peasant in 1808.

Prince of Novgorod and Kiev

In 1222, Yaroslav, finally enthroned in Novgorod, overran all of Estonia and besieged its capital Kolyvan. Four years later, he devastated Finland and baptised Karelia. His next ambition was to subjugate the Principality of Pskov, but the Novgorodians refused to make war against their neighbour. Yaroslav departed in anger and seized the Novgorodian enclave of Volokolamsk. In 1234, he returned to Veliky Novgorod and several years later defeated its chief enemies—Lithuanians and Teutonic Knights. In 1236, he followed Daniil of Halych's advice and moved from Novgorod to Kiev, leaving his son Aleksandr Nevsky as his representative in the north.

Prince of Vladimir

In 1238, when the Mongols first invaded Kievan Rus' and his elder brother Yuri was killed in battle, Yaroslav left Kiev for Vladimir, where he was crowned grand prince. Yaroslav attempted to restore the cities of the Grand Principality of Vladimir-Suzdal after the Mongol ravages and fires. In 1243, he was summoned by Batu Khan to his capital Sarai. After a lengthy conference, he returned to Vladimir with honours. Two years later, he was again summoned to the east, this time by Güyük Khan in Karakorum. There he was poisoned by the Great khan's mother Toregene and died a week after he had been allowed to return home.

Marriages and children

Grand Duke Yaroslav the city resumes after the devastation of the Tatars of Russia (Boris Chorikov)

Grand Prince Yaroslav rebuilds the cities of Rus' after Tatar invasion by Boris Chorikov.

Yaroslav married his first wife NN Yuryevna of Cumania in 1205. She was a daughter of Yuri Konchakovich, Khan of the Cumans. Her people belonged to the Kipchaks, a confederation of pastoralists and warriors of Turkic origin.

In 1214, Yaroslav married his second wife Rostislava Mstislavna. She was a daughter of Mstislav Mstislavich of Novgorod and Maria of Cumania, another Cuman princess. Her maternal grandfather was Kotyan Khan. They were divorced in 1216.

In 1218, Yaroslav married his third wife Feodosya Igoryevna of Ryazan. She was a daughter of Igor Glebovich and Agrafena Rostislavna. Her father was the second son of Gleb Rostislavich, Prince of Ryazan and Yevfrosiniya Rostislavna. They had at least twelve children:


External links




Children


Offspring of Yaroslav II of Vladimir and Rostislava Mstislavna of Smolensk (c1202-1244)
Name Birth Death Joined with
Fyodor Yaroslavich (1219-1233)
Aleksandr Nevsky (1220-1263) 30 May 1220 Pereyaslavl-Zalessky, Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia 14 November 1263 Gorodets, Nizhny Novgorod Oblast, Russia Aleksandra Bryachislavna of Polotsk (c1221-c1265)

Andrei II Yaroslavich of Vladimir (c1222-1264) 1222 1264 Ustyniya Daniilovna of Halych (c1232-c1279)

Mikhail Yaroslavich Khorobrit (1226-1248) 1226 Pereslavl-Zalessky, Russia 15 January 1248 Serpukhov, Russia
Daniil Yaroslavich (1227-1256) 1227 1256
Yaroslav Yaroslavich of Tver (1230-1272) 1230 16 September 1272 Natalya (c1230-1252)
Kseniya Yuryevna of Tarusa (c1246-1312)

Konstantin Yaroslavich of Galich-Dmitrov (1231-1255) 1225 1255 Vladimir, Vladimir Oblast, Russia
Mariya Yaroslavna (1240-1240) 1240 1240
Vasili Yaroslavich of Kostroma (1241-1276) 1241 Vladimir, Russia 1276 Kostroma
Afanasi Yaroslavich (1239-1239) 1239 1239
Yevdokiya Yaroslavna (1243-1243) 1243 1243

Siblings


Offspring of Vsevolod Yuryevich of Vladimir
Всеволод III Юрьевич Большое Гнездо and Mariya Shvarnovna of Ossetia (c1155-c1205)
Name Birth Death Joined with
Sbyslava (Pelaghea) Vsevolodovna (1178-c1180)
Vseslava Vsevolodovna (c1180-c1230)
Verchoslava Vsevolodovna (c1182-c1249) 1182 1249 Rostislav II of Kiev (1172-1218)

Konstantin Vsevolodovich of Rostov (1186-1218) 18 May 1186 Rostov, Rostov Rayon, Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia 2 February 1238 Mariya Mstislavna of Smolensk (c1187-1220)

Boris Vsevolodovich (c1187-1188)
Gleb Vsevolodovich (c1188-1189)
Yaroslav II Vsevolodovich of Vladimir (1191-1246) 8 February 1191 30 September 1249 Karakorum NN Yuryevna of Cumania (c1192-c1212)
Rostislava Mstislavna of Smolensk (c1202-1244)
Feodosya Igoryevna of Ryazan (1194-1244)

Alyona Vsevolodovna (c1194-1203)
Svyatoslav III Vsevolodovich of Vladimir (1196-1252) 27 March 1196 3 February 1252 Yevdokiya Davydovna of Murom (c1205-c1240)

Ivan Vsevolodovich of Starodub (1197-1247) 28 August 1197 1247 Nomen nescio

Anna Vsevolodovna (c1200-c1250)
Yuri II Vsevolodovich of Vladimir (1189-1238) 26 November 1189 Suzdal, Suzdal Rayon, Vladimir Oblast, Russia 4 March 1238 Agafia Vsevolodovna (c1195-1238)

Vladimir Vsevolodovich of Starodub (1192-1227) 26 October 1192 6 January 1227 Starodub-on-the-Klyazma, Kovrov Rayon, Vladimir Oblast, Russia NN Glebovna of Chernigov (c1195-c1230)


Residences

Footnotes (including sources)

Yaroslav Vsevolodovich
Born: 8 February 1191 Died: 30 September 1246
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Yaroslav Mstislavich
Prince of Pereyaslavl
1200–1206
Succeeded by
Mikhail Vsevolodovich
Preceded by
Roman Glebovich
Prince-governor of Ryazan
1208
Succeeded by
Gleb Vladimirovich
Preceded by
Creation of the Principality
Prince of Pereyaslavl-Zalessky
1212–1246
Succeeded by
Aleksandr Nevsky
Preceded by
Mstislav Mstislavich
Prince of Novgorod
1215–1216
Succeeded by
Mstislav Mstislavich
Preceded by
Vsevolod Yuryevich
Prince of Novgorod
1222–1223
Succeeded by
Vsevolod Yuryevich
Preceded by
Mikhail Vsevolodovich
Prince of Novgorod
1226–1229
Succeeded by
Mikhail Vsevolodovich
Preceded by
Rostislav Mikhailovich
Prince of Novgorod
1231–1236
Succeeded by
Aleksandr Nevsky
Preceded by
Vladimir Ryurikovich
Grand Prince of Kiev
1236–1238
Succeeded by
Mikhail Vsevolodovich
Preceded by
Yuri Vsevolodovich
Grand Prince of Vladimir
1238–1246
Succeeded by
Svyatoslav Vsevolodovich
Preceded by
Mikhail Vsevolodovich
Grand Prince of Kiev
1243–1246
Succeeded by
Aleksandr Nevsky