Plymouth Plantation - a history of the first English colonial village at Plymouth, Massachusetts and the starting point of the greater Plymouth Colony (1620-1697).

Background[edit | edit source]


Early Immigrant Ships[edit | edit source]

1623[edit | edit source]

1623 Great Fire[edit | edit source]

On 5 November 1623, Francis Sprague (1590-1676) recorded and took part in what may well have been one of the first "volunteer" fire fighting efforts to have taken place in New England. On that evening a fire broke out in one of the settlement houses that soon spread to and destroyed two or three other houses and threatened to engulf the storehouse where the settlement's winter food supply was being kept. Governor Bradford organized the fire fighting effort and the food stores were saved. It was later discovered that the fire had resulted from a deliberate act of arson.


Historic Landmarks[edit | edit source]

Jenney Grist Mill[edit | edit source]

John Jenney grist mill in Plymouth MA today.

First grist mill of Plymouth was built by John Jenney (1596-1644) in 1636.

Nestled today alongside bucolic Town Brook, and just a short walk from the waterfront and Mayflower II, the Plimoth Grist Mill tells the story of the grist (corn grinding) mill built by the Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony. After more than a decade of laboriously grinding corn by hand in wooden mortars, the colony authorized the construction of a water-powered corn grinding mill on Town Brook in 1636. Colonist John Jenney was given permission to run the mill and to take a portion of the corn that was brought for grinding as a payment or “toll.” After his death in 1644 John Jenney left the mill to his wife Sarah. Sarah, and later their son Samuel, ran the mill until 1683.


Founding Nearby Towns 1633-1643[edit | edit source]

During this time period a number of towns were founded nearby by the Plymouth settlers

Also during this time rival colonies are growing at Boston, Salem, New Amsterdam (Manhattan/Dutch) and Canada (French).

Historical Genealogical Documents[edit | edit source]


References[edit | edit source]

Mayflower 2016a.jpg

  • Mayflower and Her Passengers by Caleb Johnson - Genealogical research on all Mayflower pilgrims. 292 pages (Pulb 2006).
  • Wikipedia History of Plymouth Colony
  • Book: Plymouth Colony - Its History & People 1620-1691 by Eugene Aubrey Stratton - good genealogical history with many biographical sketches.
  • Genealogy Trails - Mayflower settlers and marriages for two generations
  • Writings of Governor Winslow - the author of several works concerning Plymouth Colony, which are now considered among the most important primary source materials about Plimoth still in existence. These include Good Newes from New England (1624); Hypocrisie Unmasked (1646),; New England's Salamander Discovered (1647); and The Glorious Progress of the Gospel Amongst The Indians of New England (1649). It is believed that he also wrote Mourt's Relation with William Bradford in 1622, although he did not sign the work.

Footnotes[edit | edit source]

Please do not list people here - but instead use the passenger lists above and/or start a page Resided in Plymouth Colony.

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