Familypedia
Advertisement
This article is based on the corresponding article in another wiki. For Familypedia purposes, it requires significantly more historical detail on phases of this location's development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there. Also desirable are links to organizations that may be repositories of genealogical information..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can.


Pima County, Arizona
Pima County Courthouse 10.JPG
Pima County Courthouse
Seal of Pima County, Arizona
Seal
Map of Arizona highlighting Pima County
Location in the state of Arizona
Map of the U.S. highlighting Arizona
Arizona's location in the U.S.
Founded November 9, 1864
Named for Pima people
Seat Tucson
Largest city Tucson
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

9,189 sq mi (23,799 km²)
9,187 sq mi (23,794 km²)
2.1 sq mi (5 km²), 0.02%
Population
 -  Density


Congressional districts 1st, 2nd, 3rd
Time zone Mountain: UTC-7
Website www.pima.gov

Pima County Fair, 2007

Pima County ( /ˈpmə/ PEE-mə) is a county in the south central region of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, the population was 980,263,[1] making it Arizona's second-most populous county. The county seat is Tucson,[2] where most of the population is centered. The county is named after the Pima Native Americans who are indigenous to this area.

Pima County includes the entirety of the Tucson Metropolitan Statistical Area, and it is the third largest metropolitan area in the Southwestern United States.

Pima County contains parts of the Tohono O'odham Nation, as well as all of the San Xavier Indian Reservation, the Pascua Yaqui Indian Reservation, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ironwood Forest National Monument and Saguaro National Park.

The vast majority of the county population lies in and around the city of Tucson (2017 city population: 535,677), filling much of the eastern part of the county with urban development. Tucson, Arizona's second largest city, is a major commercial and academic center. Other urban areas include the Tucson suburbs of Marana (population 44,792), Oro Valley (population 44,350), Sahuarita (population 29,318), and South Tucson (population 5,643), a large ring of unincorporated urban development, and the growing satellite town Green Valley. The rest of the county is sparsely populated; the largest towns are Sells, the capital of the Tohono O'odham Nation, and Ajo in the county's far western region.

History[]

Pima County, one of the four original counties in Arizona, was created by the 1st Arizona Territorial Legislature with land acquired through the Gadsden Purchase from Mexico in 1853. The original county consisted of all of Arizona Territory east of longitude 113° 20' and south of the Gila River.[3] Soon thereafter, the counties of Cochise, Graham and Santa Cruz were carved from the original Pima County.[4]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 9,189 square miles (23,800 km2), of which 9,187 square miles (23,790 km2) is land and 2.1 square miles (5.4 km2) (0.02%) is water.[5]

Topographic features[]

  • Mountains of Pima County
  • Fresnal Canyon

Major highways[]

  • I-10 (AZ).svg Interstate 10
  • I-19 (AZ).svg Interstate 19
  • US 80 (AZ historic).svg Historic U.S. Route 80
  • Arizona 77.svg State Route 77
  • Arizona 83.svg State Route 83
  • Arizona 85.svg State Route 85
  • Arizona 86.svg State Route 86
  • Arizona 210.svg State Route 210
  • Arizona 989.svg State Route 989

Adjacent counties and municipalities[]

National protected areas[]

  • Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge
  • Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge (part)
  • Coronado National Forest (part)
  • Ironwood Forest National Monument (part)
  • Official Pima County Logo

    Old Pima County Courthouse

    Las Cienegas National Conservation Area (part)
  • Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument
  • Saguaro National Park

Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan[]

The Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan (SDCP) is Pima County's plan for desert conservation.

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1870 5,716
1880 17,006 197.5%
1890 12,673 −25.5%
1900 14,689 15.9%
1910 22,818 55.3%
1920 34,680 52.0%
1930 55,676 60.5%
1940 72,838 30.8%
1950 141,216 93.9%
1960 265,660 88.1%
1970 351,667 32.4%
1980 531,443 51.1%
1990 666,880 25.5%
2000 843,746 26.5%
2010 980,263 16.2%
Est. 2019 1,047,279 [6] 24.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790–1960[8] 1900–1990[9]
1990–2000[10] 2010–2018[1]

2000 census[]

As of the 2000 census, there were 843,746 people, 332,350 households, and 212,039 families living in the county. The population density was 92 people per square mile (35/km2). There were 366,737 housing units at an average density of 40 per square mile (15/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 75.1% White, 3.0% Black or African American, 3.2% Native American, 2.0% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 13.3% from other races, and 3.2% from two or more races. 29.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 22.8% reported speaking Spanish at home.[11]

There were 332,350 households, out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.2% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.6% under the age of 18, 10.9% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 95.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.7 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,758, and the median income for a family was $44,446. Males had a median income of $32,156 versus $24,959 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,785. About 10.5% of families and 14.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.4% of those under age 18 and 8.2% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 census, there were 980,263 people, 388,660 households, and 243,167 families living in the county.[12] The population density was 106.7 inhabitants per square mile (41.2 /km2). There were 440,909 housing units at an average density of 48.0 per square mile (18.5 /km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 74.3% white, 3.5% black or African American, 3.3% American Indian, 2.6% Asian, 0.2% Pacific islander, 12.3% from other races, and 3.7% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 34.6% of the population.[12]

The largest ancestry groups were:[14]

  • 30.8% Mexican
  • 16.2% German
  • 10.6% Irish
  • 9.9% English
  • 4.5% Italian
  • 3.1% French
  • 2.8% American
  • 2.7% Polish
  • 2.4% Scottish
  • 1.8% Scotch-Irish
  • 1.7% Norwegian
  • 1.6% Dutch
  • 1.6% Swedish
  • 1.1% Russian

Of the 388,660 households, 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.5% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 37.4% were non-families, and 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.06. The median age was 37.7 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $45,521 and the median income for a family was $57,377. Males had a median income of $42,313 versus $33,487 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,093. About 11.2% of families and 16.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.6% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.[15]

Metropolitan Statistical Area[]

The United States Office of Management and Budget has designated Pima County as the Tucson, AZ Metropolitan Statistical Area.[16] The United States Census Bureau ranked the Tucson, AZ Metropolitan Statistical Area as the 53rd most populous metropolitan statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012.[17]

The Office of Management and Budget has further designated the Tucson, AZ Metropolitan Statistical Area as a component of the more extensive Tucson-Nogales, AZ Combined Statistical Area,[16] the 53rd most populous combined statistical area and the 59th most populous primary statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012.[17][18]

Government, policing, and politics[]

Pima County is governed by a five-member Board of Supervisors who set ordinances and run services for the areas that do not fall within any city or town's jurisdiction.

Board of Supervisors and elected positions[]

The Pima County Board of Supervisors is responsible for steering public policy in the region. The five-member board provides direction to the County Administrator and the county's various departments as they work to ensure safe communities, nurture economic development, sustainably manage natural resources and protect public health. In addition to overseeing the delivery of a host of municipal services, from roads to parks and libraries and law enforcement, board members also are responsible for approving the county budget. Elected to four-year terms, board members also set the amount of taxes to be levied.

Party District Name First elected Area(s) represented Official Website
  Democrat District 1 Rex Scott 2020 Oro Valley, Marana, Catalina Foothills District 1
  Democratic District 2 Matt Heinz 2020 Tucson, Sahuarita, South Tucson District 2
  Democratic District 3 Sharon Bronson 1996 Tucson, Marana, Three Points, Sahuarita District 3
  Republican District 4 Steve Christy 2016 Tucson, Vail, Summerhaven, Green Valley District 4
  Democratic District 5 Adelita Grijalva 2020 Tucson, Sahuarita, Green Valley District 5

[19]

Along with the Board of Supervisors the Arizona State Constitution allows for 7 other county elected officials.

Party Office Name First elected References
  Democratic Assessor Suzanne Droubie 2020 [20]
  Democratic County Attorney Laura Conover 2020 [21]
  Democratic County Recorder Gabriella Cázares-Kelly 2020 [22]
  Democratic County School Superintendent Dustin Williams 2016 [23]
  Democratic Sheriff Chris Nanos 2020 [24]
  Republican Treasurer Beth Ford 2000 [25]
  Democratic Clerk of Superior Court Gary Harrison 2020 [26]

Pima County sheriff[]

The Pima County Sheriff's Department provides court protection, administers the county jail, provides coroner service, and patrols the unincorporated parts of Pima County. It is the seventh largest sheriff's department in the nation.[27] Incorporated towns within the county with municipal police departments are Tucson, Marana, Oro Valley, and Sahuarita.

Politics[]

Being home to a major population center and a major research university, Pima County is one of the most reliably Democratic counties in Arizona. After voting Democratic through 1930s and 1940s, it swung to Republican following major population increase after World War II, becoming a Republican-leaning county. However, in 1964, it rejected Arizona's native son Barry Goldwater by seven points, who won statewide by one point. However, despite the county's Republican lean, Democrats would not win 40% of the vote only twice - in 1972, when George McGovern lost in a 49-state landslide and due to a balloting error in the county, the Socialist Workers Party came a distant third with 18% of the vote;[28] and in 1980, when Jimmy Carter, being largely insensitive to Western states' issues, also lost many votes to independent John B. Anderson. Following Bill Clinton's plurality victory by 12 points in 1992, all Democrats since 1996 have won the county by a majority and no Republican has come closer than six points in recapturing the county. In both 2016 and 2020, Donald Trump became the first Republican since Bob Dole in 1996 to fail to win 40% of the county's vote.

United States presidential election results for Pima County, Arizona[29]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 207,758 39.79% 304,981 58.41% 9,435 1.81%
2016 167,428 39.71% 224,661 53.28% 29,551 7.01%
2012 174,779 45.61% 201,251 52.52% 7,143 1.86%
2008 182,406 46.20% 206,254 52.24% 6,180 1.57%
2004 171,109 46.56% 193,128 52.55% 3,255 0.89%
2000 124,579 43.31% 147,688 51.34% 15,373 5.34%
1996 104,121 39.36% 137,983 52.16% 22,448 8.49%
1992 97,036 34.47% 128,569 45.68% 55,879 19.85%
1988 117,899 50.28% 113,824 48.54% 2,750 1.17%
1984 123,830 56.90% 91,585 42.09% 2,197 1.01%
1980 93,055 49.75% 64,418 34.44% 29,584 15.82%
1976 77,264 49.83% 71,214 45.93% 6,583 4.25%
1972 73,154 45.41% 56,223 34.90% 31,733 19.70%
1968 49,479 50.61% 39,786 40.70% 8,501 8.70%
1964 46,955 46.36% 54,120 53.44% 203 0.20%
1960 46,734 52.43% 42,171 47.31% 239 0.27%
1956 39,298 62.49% 23,536 37.43% 51 0.08%
1952 32,113 60.19% 21,237 39.81% 0 0.00%
1948 16,968 47.63% 17,692 49.66% 965 2.71%
1944 10,850 45.37% 13,006 54.39% 57 0.24%
1940 9,445 40.09% 14,035 59.57% 82 0.35%
1936 6,079 32.70% 12,249 65.89% 262 1.41%
1932 6,152 34.70% 11,061 62.40% 514 2.90%
1928 6,635 56.94% 4,976 42.70% 42 0.36%
1924 3,559 42.17% 2,594 30.74% 2,286 27.09%
1920 3,392 58.01% 2,455 41.99% 0 0.00%
1916 2,616 53.15% 2,079 42.24% 227 4.61%
1912 353 19.57% 693 38.41% 758 42.02%



Communities[]

Map of the incorporated and unincorporated cities and towns in Pima County. Also shown are the borders for the Indian Reservations in the county.

Astronaut photo of the open-pit copper mines adjacent to Green Valley, 2010. Note that north is to the left.

Cities[]

  • South Tucson
  • Tucson (county seat)

Towns[]

  • Marana (Partially in Pinal County)
  • Oro Valley
  • Sahuarita

Ghost towns[]

  • Achi
  • Ahan Owuch
  • Ak Chut Vaya
  • Allen
  • Cerro Colorado
  • Helvetia
  • Kentucky
  • Pantano
  • Redington
  • San Rafael
  • Total Wreck
  • Twin Buttes
  • List of ghost towns in Arizona

Census-designated places[]

  • Ajo
  • Ak Chin
  • Ali Chuk
  • Ali Chukson
  • Ali Molina
  • Anegam
  • Arivaca
  • Arivaca Junction
  • Avra Valley
  • Casas Adobes
  • Catalina
  • Catalina Foothills
  • Chiawuli Tak
  • Charco
  • Comobabi
  • Corona de Tucson
  • Cowlic
  • Drexel Heights
  • Elephant Head
  • Flowing Wells
  • Green Valley
  • Gu Oidak
  • Haivana Nakya
  • J-Six Ranchettes
  • Kleindale
  • Ko Vaya
  • Littletown
  • Maish Vaya
  • Nelson
  • Nolic
  • Picture Rocks
  • Pimaco Two
  • Pisinemo
  • Rillito
  • Rincon Valley
  • San Miguel
  • Santa Rosa
  • Sells
  • South Komelik
  • Summerhaven
  • Summit
  • Tanque Verde
  • Three Points
  • Topawa
  • Tucson Estates
  • Tucson Mountains
  • Vail
  • Valencia West
  • Ventana
  • Wahak Hotrontk
  • Why
  • Willow Canyon

Indian communities[]

  • Pascua Yaqui
  • San Xavier
  • Tohono O'odham (part)

Other communities[]

  • Drexel-Alvernon
  • East Sahuarita
  • Kentucky Camp
  • Lukeville
  • Redington
  • Sasabe
  • Tortolita

County population ranking[]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Pima County.[30][31]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Population (2010 Census) Municipal type Incorporated
1 Tucson 520,116 City 1775
2 Casas Adobes 66,795 CDP
3 Catalina Foothills 50,796 CDP
4 Oro Valley 41,011 Town 1974
5 Marana 34,961 Town 1977
6 Drexel Heights 27,749 CDP
7 Sahuarita 25,259 Town 1994
8 Green Valley 21,391 CDP
9 Tanque Verde 16,901 CDP
10 Flowing Wells 16,419 CDP
11 Tucson Estates 12,192 CDP
12 Vail 10,208 CDP
13 Picture Rocks 9,563 CDP
14 Valencia West 9,355 CDP
15 Catalina 7,569 CDP
16 Avra Valley 6,050 CDP
17 Corona de Tucson 5,675 CDP
18 South Tucson 5,652 City 1940
19 Three Points 5,581 CDP
20 Summit 5,372 CDP
21 Rincon Valley 5,139 CDP
22 Ajo 3,304 CDP
23 Sells 2,495 CDP
24 Arivaca Junction 1,090 CDP
25 Littletown 873 CDP
26 Arivaca 695 CDP
27 Pimaco Two 682 CDP
28 Santa Rosa 628 CDP
29 Elephant Head 612 CDP
30 Pisinemo 321 CDP
31 Topawa 299 CDP
32 Nelson 259 CDP
33 San Miguel 197 CDP
34 Gu Oidak 188 CDP
35 Why 167 CDP
36 Ali Chuk 161 CDP
37 Maish Vaya 158 CDP
38 Anegam 151 CDP
39 Cowlic 135 CDP
40 Ali Chukson 132 CDP
41 Wahak Hotrontk 114 CDP
42 South Komelik 111 CDP
43 Rillito 97 CDP
44 Haivana Nakya 96 CDP
45 Chiawuli Tak 78 CDP
46 Ali Molina 71 CDP
47 Charco 52 CDP
48 Ventana 49 CDP
49 Ko Vaya 46 CDP
50 Summerhaven 40 CDP
51 Nolic 37 CDP
52 Ak Chin 30 CDP
53 Comobabi 8 CDP
54 Willow Canyon 1 CDP

Tourist attractions[]

Annual events[]

  • Pima County Fair

Locations of Interest[]

See also[]

Commons-logo.png
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Pima County, Arizona
  • Pima County Sheriff's Department
  • John G.F. Speiden - Jay Six Ranch
  • Federal Correctional Complex, Tucson

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/04/04001.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Wagoner, Jay J. (1970). Arizona Territory 1863–1912: A Political history. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. p. 58. ISBN 0-8165-0176-9. https://archive.org/details/arizonaterritory00wago/page/58. 
  4. ^ "History: Pima County". Pima County Justice Court. September 27, 2000. http://jp.pima.gov/Pages/history/county.htm. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 23, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_04.txt. 
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/data/tables.2018.html. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/az190090.txt. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  11. ^ "Language Map Data Center". Mla.org. April 3, 2013. http://www.mla.org/map_data_results&state_id=4&county_id=19&mode=geographic&order=r. 
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US04019. 
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US04019. 
  14. ^ "DP02 Selected Social Characteristics in the United States – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US04019. 
  15. ^ "DP03 Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US04019. 
  16. ^ a b "OMB Bulletin No. 13-01: Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas". Office of Management and Budget. February 28, 2013. https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/omb/bulletins/2013/b13-01.pdf. 
  17. ^ a b "Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012" (CSV). 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. https://www.census.gov/popest/data/metro/totals/2012/tables/CBSA-EST2012-01.csv. 
  18. ^ "Table 2. Annual Estimates of the Population of Combined Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012" (CSV). 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. https://www.census.gov/popest/data/metro/totals/2012/tables/CBSA-EST2012-02.csv. 
  19. ^ "Board of Supervisors - Pima County". Pima.gov. April 16, 2013. http://www.pima.gov/bos/. 
  20. ^ "Office of The Pima County Assessor". http://www.asr.pima.gov/. 
  21. ^ "Pima County Attorney". http://www.pcao.pima.gov/. 
  22. ^ "Pima County Recorder's Office - Recorder Chronology". https://www.recorder.pima.gov/RecorderChronology. 
  23. ^ "Meet the Superintendent - Pima County Schools - Tucson, AZ" (in en). http://www.schools.pima.gov/about-us/meet-the-superintendent. 
  24. ^ "Pima County Sheriff's Department :: Welcome from Sheriff Napier" (in en). http://editorialmac.com/about-us/meet-sheriff/. 
  25. ^ "Home" (in en-gb). http://www.to.pima.gov/. 
  26. ^ "Home" (in en-gb). http://www.cosc.pima.gov/. 
  27. ^ Pima County Sheriff wikipedia site
  28. ^ Seeley, John (2000-11-22). "Early and Often" (in en-US). https://www.laweekly.com/early-and-often-3/. 
  29. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of United States Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/. 
  30. ^ Center for New Media and Promotions(C2PO). "2010 Census". census.gov. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade.2010.html. 
  31. ^ Geographic Products Branch. "2010 Census Block Maps - Geography - U.S. Census Bureau". census.gov. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/maps/block/2010/. 

External links[]


Advertisement