Familypedia
Advertisement
This article is based on the corresponding article in another wiki. For Familypedia purposes, it requires significantly more historical detail on phases of this location's development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there. Also desirable are links to organizations that may be repositories of genealogical information..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can.


Oklahoma County, Oklahoma
Oklahoma City OK Oklahoma County Courthouse (Taken 20120926).jpg
Oklahoma County Courthouse
Seal of Oklahoma County, Oklahoma
Seal
Map of Oklahoma highlighting Oklahoma County
Location in the state of Oklahoma
Map of the U.S. highlighting Oklahoma
Oklahoma's location in the U.S.
Founded 1890
Seat Oklahoma City
Largest city Oklahoma City
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

718 sq mi (1,860 km²)
708.82 sq mi (1,836 km²)
9.6 sq mi (25 km²), 1.3%
PopulationEst.
 - (2019)
 - Density

797,434
1,111.6/sq mi (429/km²)
Congressional districts 4th, 5th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.oklahomacounty.org

Oklahoma County is located in the central part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 718,633,[1] making it the most populous county in Oklahoma. The county seat is Oklahoma City,[2] the state capital and largest city.

Oklahoma County is at the heart of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Oklahoma County is one of seven counties in the United States to share the same name as the state it is located in (the other six counties are Arkansas County, Hawaii County, Idaho County, Iowa County, New York County (known commonly as Manhattan), and Utah County), and the only one of the seven to contain the state capital.[3]

History[]

The area that would someday be called Oklahoma County was originally inhabited by members of the indigenous nations of the Southern Plains, but by the 1830s the land would become part of the territory assigned to the Seminoles and Creeks after their removal from their ancestral lands in the Southeastern USA.

As a result of the Reconstruction era treaties signed between the US government and the Seminole and Creek nations in 1866, the land was taken from tribal jurisdiction but not assigned to other tribal governments, which in time led it to be called the Unassigned Lands. In 1889, the US federal government held a land run for the Unassigned lands, which led to the rapid settlement of the area.[4]

By 1890, Oklahoma County was called "County Two" and was one of seven counties established by the Organic Act of 1890.[5]

County business initially took place in a building at the intersection of California Avenue and Robinson Street until the construction of the first Oklahoma County Courthouse at 520 West Main Street in the 1900s. In 1937, the county government was moved to a building at 321 Park Avenue, which now serves only as the county courthouse.[6]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 718 square miles (1,860 km2), of which 709 square miles (1,840 km2) is land and 9.6 square miles (25 km2) (1.3%) is water.[7]

Major highways[]

  • I-35
  • I-40
  • I-44
  • I-235
  • I-240
  • US-62
  • US-66
  • US-77
  • US-270
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link Turnpike|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev Turnpike]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link Turnpike|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev Turnpike]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link Turnpike|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev Turnpike]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]

Adjacent counties[]

National protected area[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1890 11,742
1900 25,915 120.7%
1910 85,232 228.9%
1920 116,307 36.5%
1930 221,738 90.6%
1940 244,159 10.1%
1950 325,352 33.3%
1960 439,506 35.1%
1970 526,805 19.9%
1980 568,933 8.0%
1990 599,611 5.4%
2000 660,448 10.1%
2010 718,633 8.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2019[1]

Age pyramid for Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data.

As of the Census of 2010, there were 718,633 people, 277,615 households, and 172,572 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,013 people per square mile (391/km2). There were 319,828 housing units at an average density of 416 per square mile (161/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 64.6% White, 15.4% Black or African American, 3.5% Native American, 3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 8.1% from other races, and 5.3% from two or more races. 15.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[12] 12.4% were of German, 12.3% Mexican, 10.1% Irish, 7.9% English, and 7.7% American ancestries according to the Census 2010. 84.4% spoke English and 11.5% Spanish as their first language.[13]

There were 277,615 households, out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.1% were married couples living together, 15.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.8% were non-families. 31.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.60% under the age of 18, 10.90% from 18 to 24, 30.00% from 25 to 44, 21.40% from 45 to 64, and 12.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,916, and the median income for a family was $54,721. The per capita income for the county was $25,723. About 11.70% of families and 15.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.70% of those under age 18 and 8.60% of those age 65 or over.[14]

Politics[]

Since the second half of the 20th century, Oklahoma County has been quite conservative for an urban county. It swung from a 20-point victory for Harry Truman in 1948 to a 15-point victory for Dwight Eisenhower in 1952. It has gone Republican in all but one presidential election since then; it narrowly voted for Lyndon Johnson in 1964. This mirrors the growing Republican trend in Oklahoma since the end of World War II.

However, the Republican share of votes for President has decreased in every election since the 2004 election. In the 2018 Oklahoma gubernatorial election, Oklahoma County gave Democratic candidate Drew Edmondson the largest vote share of any county, with 54.2% of the vote, whereas Republican Mary Fallin won the county with 51.3% of the vote four years prior.[15] Also, in the 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Oklahoma, Democrat Kendra Horn received 52.3% of the vote in Oklahoma County, which was the only county in the state to vote for a Democratic House candidate.[16] In the 2020 United States Presidential election, Republican Donald Trump narrowly carried the county (1% margin), down from 10 points in 2016.

County Commissioners[]

District Name Party Took office
1 Carrie Blumert Democratic 2019
2 Brian Maughan Republican 2009
3 Kevin Calvey Republican 2019

County Offices[]

Office Name Party Took office
Assessor Larry Stein Republican 2019
County Clerk David B. Hooten Republican 2017
Court Clerk Rick Warren Republican 2017
District Attorney David Prater Democratic 2007
Sheriff Tommy Johnson III Republican 2021
Treasurer Forrest Freeman Republican 1993

Oklahoma House of Representatives[]

District Name Party Took office
31 Gary Mize Republican 2019
39 Ryan Martinez Republican 2016
41 Denise Crosswhite-Hader Republican 2019
54 Kevin West Republican 2016
82 Nicole Miller Republican 2019
83 Chelsey Branham Democratic 2019
84 Tammy West Republican 2016
85 Cyndi Muson Democratic 2015
87 Collin Walke Democratic 2016
88 Mauree Turner Democratic 2020
89 Jose Cruz Democratic 2020
90 Jon Echols Republican 2013
92 Forrest Bennett Democratic 2016
93 Mickey Dollens Democratic 2016
94 Andy Fugate Democratic 2019
95 Kelley Albright Democratic 2019
96 Lewis Moore Republican 2009
97 Jason Lowe Democratic 2016
99 Ajay Pittman Democratic 2019
100 Marilyn Stark Republican 2019
101 Robert Manger Republican 2019

Oklahoma Senate[]

District Name Party Took office
15 Rob Standridge Republican 2012
17 Ron Sharp Republican 2012
22 Jake Merrick Republican 2021
30 Julia Kirt Democratic 2018
40 Carrie Hicks Democratic 2018
41 Adam Pugh Republican 2016
42 Brenda Stanley Republican 2018
44 Michael Brooks Democratic 2017
45 Paul Rosino Republican 2017
46 Kay Floyd Democratic 2014
47 Greg Treat Republican 2011
48 George Young Democratic 2018

Congressional[]

District Name Party Took office
OK-4 Tom Cole Republican 2003
OK-5 Stephanie Bice Republican 2021
Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of January 15, 2021[17]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
Democratic 165,270 37.18%
Republican 190,473 42.85%
Libertarian 3,540 0.80%
Unaffiliated 85,208 19.17%
Total 444,491 100%
United States presidential election results for Oklahoma County, Oklahoma[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 145,050 49.21% 141,724 48.08% 7,966 2.70%
2016 141,569 51.68% 112,813 41.18% 19,560 7.14%
2012 149,728 58.33% 106,982 41.67% 0 0.00%
2008 163,172 58.41% 116,182 41.59% 0 0.00%
2004 174,741 64.23% 97,298 35.77% 0 0.00%
2000 139,078 62.34% 81,590 36.57% 2,443 1.09%
1996 120,429 54.68% 80,438 36.52% 19,386 8.80%
1992 126,788 48.78% 76,271 29.34% 56,864 21.88%
1988 135,376 63.59% 75,812 35.61% 1,703 0.80%
1984 159,974 71.65% 60,235 26.98% 3,052 1.37%
1980 139,538 66.05% 58,765 27.81% 12,970 6.14%
1976 119,120 56.69% 87,185 41.49% 3,808 1.81%
1972 156,437 75.24% 46,986 22.60% 4,502 2.17%
1968 93,212 49.73% 60,395 32.22% 33,834 18.05%
1964 83,660 48.00% 90,641 52.00% 0 0.00%
1960 102,992 61.44% 64,648 38.56% 0 0.00%
1956 85,395 59.76% 57,512 40.24% 0 0.00%
1952 95,492 57.63% 70,199 42.37% 0 0.00%
1948 40,161 40.11% 59,954 59.89% 0 0.00%
1944 42,464 42.30% 57,812 57.59% 116 0.12%
1940 35,639 39.77% 53,649 59.86% 329 0.37%
1936 24,312 32.15% 50,946 67.36% 373 0.49%
1932 21,238 34.05% 41,130 65.95% 0 0.00%
1928 36,608 69.13% 16,073 30.35% 272 0.51%
1924 17,504 40.63% 21,708 50.38% 3,873 8.99%
1920 15,350 44.68% 17,820 51.86% 1,189 3.46%
1916 5,291 36.33% 7,971 54.73% 1,302 8.94%
1912 5,706 42.02% 6,963 51.28% 910 6.70%
1908 5,401 50.03% 4,876 45.17% 518 4.80%



Communities[]

Cities[]

Towns[]

  • Arcadia
  • Forest Park
  • Jones
  • Lake Aluma
  • Luther
  • Smith Village
  • Valley Brook
  • Woodlawn Park

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Newalla

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/40/40109.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Joseph Nathan Kane; Charles Curry Aiken (2005). The American Counties: Origins of County Names, Dates of Creation, and Population Data, 1950-2000. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-5036-1. https://archive.org/details/americancounties0000kane. 
  4. ^ "Unassigned lands" Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, Oklahoma Historical Society. Accessed August 10, 2021.
  5. ^ Wilson, Linda D. "Oklahoma County," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, Oklahoma Historical Society, 2009. Accessed April 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "A Brief History of Oklahoma County Government." OklahomaCounty.org. Accessed September 17, 2009.
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_40.txt. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ok190090.txt. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  12. ^ "Archived copy". http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid%3DDEC_10_DP_DPDP1%26prodType%3Dtable. 
  13. ^ [1]
  14. ^ "Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (OK) income map, earnings map, and wages data" (in en). http://www.city-data.com/income/income-Oklahoma-City-Oklahoma.html. 
  15. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/elections/2014/oklahoma-elections
  16. ^ https://results.okelections.us/OKER/?elecDate=20181106
  17. ^ "Current Registration Statistics by County" (PDF). January 15, 2021. https://oklahoma.gov/content/dam/ok/en/elections/voter-registration-statistics/vrstats-county-20210115.pdf. 
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

Commons-logo.png
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Coordinates: 35°29′N 97°32′W / 35.48, -97.53

Advertisement