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Montgomery County, Ohio
New Montgomery County Courthouse, Dayton.jpg
Current Montgomery County Courthouse
Seal of Montgomery County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Montgomery County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded May 1, 1803[1]
Named for Richard Montgomery
Seat Dayton
Largest city Dayton
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

464 sq mi (1,202 km²)
462 sq mi (1,197 km²)
2.8 sq mi (7 km²), 0.6%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

537,309
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 10th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.mcohio.org

Montgomery County is located in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 537,309,[2] making it the fifth-most populous county in Ohio.[3] The county seat is Dayton.[4] The county was named in honor of Richard Montgomery, an American Revolutionary War general killed in 1775 while attempting to capture Quebec City, Canada.[5]

Montgomery County is part of the Dayton, Ohio Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 464 square miles (1,200 km2), of which 462 square miles (1,200 km2) is land and 2.8 square miles (7.3 km2) (0.6%) is water.[6]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

  • I-70.svg Interstate 70
  • Alternate plate blue.svg
    I-70.svg Interstate 70 Alternate
  • I-75.svg Interstate 75
  • I-675.svg Interstate 675
  • US 25.svg U.S. Route 25
  • US 35.svg U.S. Route 35
  • US 40.svg U.S. Route 40
  • OH-4.svg State Route 4
  • OH-48.svg State Route 48
  • OH-49.svg State Route 49
  • OH-123.svg State Route 123
  • OH-201.svg State Route 201
  • OH-202.svg State Route 202
  • OH-235.svg State Route 235
  • OH-444.svg State Route 444
  • OH-725.svg State Route 725
  • OH-741.svg State Route 741
  • OH-835.svg State Route 835

National protected area

  • Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park (part)

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1810 7,722
1820 15,999 107.2%
1830 24,362 52.3%
1840 31,938 31.1%
1850 38,218 19.7%
1860 52,230 36.7%
1870 64,006 22.5%
1880 78,550 22.7%
1890 100,552 28.0%
1900 130,146 29.4%
1910 163,763 25.8%
1920 209,532 27.9%
1930 273,481 30.5%
1940 295,480 8.0%
1950 398,441 34.8%
1960 527,080 32.3%
1970 606,148 15.0%
1980 571,697 −5.7%
1990 573,809 0.4%
2000 559,062 −2.6%
2010 535,153 −4.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2020 [11]

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 559,062 people, 229,229 households, and 146,935 families living in the county. The population density was 1,211 people per square mile (468/km2). There were 248,443 housing units at an average density of 538 per square mile (208/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 76.57% White, 19.86% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 1.31% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.49% from other races, and 1.51% from two or more races. 1.27% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 229,229 households, out of which 29.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.30% were married couples living together, 13.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.90% were non-families. 30.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37, and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.70% under the age of 18, 9.70% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 22.90% from 45 to 64, and 13.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,156, and the median income for a family was $50,071. Males had a median income of $38,710 versus $27,297 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,743. About 8.30% of families and 11.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.60% of those under age 18 and 8.20% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 Census, there were 535,153 people, 223,943 households, and 138,060 families living in the county.[12] The population density was 1,159.5 inhabitants per square mile (447.7 /km2). There were 254,775 housing units at an average density of 552.0 per square mile (213.1 /km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 73.9% white, 20.9% black or African American, 1.7% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.8% from other races, and 2.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.3% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 24.9% were German, 12.8% were Irish, 9.7% were American, and 8.8% were English.[14]

Of the 223,943 households, 29.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.6% were married couples living together, 15.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 38.4% were non-families, and 32.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.33, and the average family size was 2.94. The median age was 39.2 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $43,965, and the median income for a family was $56,559. Males had a median income of $45,680 versus $34,991 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,828. About 11.7% of families and 15.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.7% of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those aged 65 or over.[15]

Government

Current officials

  • Board of Commissioners:
    • Judy Dodge (D)
    • Debbie Lieberman (D)
    • Carolyn Rice (D)
  • County Auditor: Karl L. Keith (D)
  • Clerk of Courts: Mike Foley (R)
  • County Coroner: Dr. Kent Harshbarger
  • County Engineer: Paul Gruner (D)
  • County Prosecutor: Mathias H. Heck Jr. (D)
  • County Recorder: Brandon McClain (D)
  • Sheriff: Rob Streck (R)
  • County Treasurer: Russ Joseph (D)

See also:

  • Election Results, Montgomery County, Ohio

Politics

In the six presidential elections until 2016, Montgomery County has favored the Democratic candidate, but not by large margins. However, in 2016, Republican Donald Trump narrowly defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton. Montgomery County was also the most populated county in Ohio to go for Trump in 2016, and it was the only county in Ohio to flip for Joe Biden in 2020.

United States presidential election results for Montgomery County, Ohio[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 129,034 47.94% 135,064 50.18% 5,066 1.88%
2016 123,909 47.68% 122,016 46.95% 13,951 5.37%
2012 124,841 46.81% 137,139 51.42% 4,727 1.77%
2008 128,679 46.12% 145,997 52.32% 4,355 1.56%
2004 138,371 48.97% 142,997 50.60% 1,216 0.43%
2000 109,792 47.53% 114,597 49.61% 6,598 2.86%
1996 95,391 41.30% 115,469 50.00% 20,097 8.70%
1992 104,751 40.02% 108,017 41.27% 48,952 18.70%
1988 131,596 57.48% 95,737 41.82% 1,610 0.70%
1984 137,053 58.97% 94,016 40.45% 1,333 0.57%
1980 101,443 45.49% 105,110 47.13% 16,456 7.38%
1976 100,223 47.40% 106,468 50.35% 4,745 2.24%
1972 120,998 58.02% 82,231 39.43% 5,323 2.55%
1968 84,766 40.93% 96,082 46.39% 26,272 12.68%
1964 71,979 36.24% 126,633 63.76% 0 0.00%
1960 109,602 52.71% 98,325 47.29% 0 0.00%
1956 107,278 58.45% 76,270 41.55% 0 0.00%
1952 91,905 53.51% 79,860 46.49% 0 0.00%
1948 60,048 43.48% 76,879 55.66% 1,187 0.86%
1944 63,336 43.47% 82,367 56.53% 0 0.00%
1940 57,866 40.20% 86,084 59.80% 0 0.00%
1936 44,742 35.02% 76,430 59.81% 6,606 5.17%
1932 49,267 46.60% 51,270 48.50% 5,180 4.90%
1928 71,279 64.53% 38,517 34.87% 665 0.60%
1924 50,845 62.61% 21,860 26.92% 8,505 10.47%
1920 46,493 51.67% 38,433 42.72% 5,049 5.61%
1916 19,683 41.99% 24,339 51.92% 2,853 6.09%
1912 10,341 26.15% 15,544 39.31% 13,653 34.53%
1908 20,069 47.09% 20,566 48.26% 1,980 4.65%
1904 22,144 58.70% 13,933 36.93% 1,648 4.37%
1900 19,606 53.55% 16,236 44.34% 772 2.11%
1896 18,333 53.56% 15,540 45.40% 359 1.05%
1892 13,197 46.88% 14,067 49.97% 888 3.15%
1888 12,491 47.89% 13,142 50.38% 451 1.73%
1884 11,524 50.12% 11,326 49.26% 143 0.62%
1880 9,726 48.28% 10,332 51.28% 89 0.44%
1876 7,921 46.82% 8,971 53.02% 27 0.16%
1872 6,998 49.17% 7,183 50.47% 50 0.35%
1868 6,502 51.54% 6,113 48.46% 0 0.00%
1864 5,554 51.21% 5,291 48.79% 0 0.00%
1860 4,974 50.07% 4,710 47.41% 251 2.53%
1856 4,038 46.34% 4,285 49.17% 391 4.49%



Education

Post-secondary institutions

Public

  • Air Force Institute of Technology (actually located in Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio).
  • Sinclair Community College
  • Wright State University (actually located in neighboring Greene County, Ohio, but uses a Dayton address).

Private

  • University of Dayton
  • Kettering College of Medical Arts
  • The Miami Valley School

Public schools

The following public school districts are located partially or entirely in Montgomery County:

  • Local School Districts
    • Brookville Local Schools
      • Brookville High School, Brookville (the Blue Devils)
  • The Dayton Regional STEM School
    • New Lebanon Local Schools
      • Dixie High School, Dixie (the Greyhounds)
    • Jefferson Township Local Schools
      • Jefferson Township High School, Dayton (the Broncos)
    • Northridge Local School District
      • Northridge High School (the Polar Bears)
    • Mad River Local Schools
      • Walter E. Stebbins High School, Riverside (the Indians)
    • Valley View Local Schools
      • Valley View High School, Germantown (the Spartans)
  • City School Districts
    • Centerville City Schools
      • Centerville High School, Centerville (the Elks)
    • Dayton Public Schools
      • Belmont High School for Computer Technology/Engineering, Dayton (the Bison)
      • Thurgood Marshall High School for the Arts, Dayton (the Cougars)
      • Dayton Early College Academy, Dayton
      • Dunbar High School for Professional Studies, Dayton (the Wolverines)
      • Meadowdale High School for Cultural Studies/International Baccalaureate, Dayton (the Lions)
      • Stivers School for the Arts, Dayton (Tigers)
    • Huber Heights City Schools
      • Wayne High School, Huber Heights (the Warriors)
    • Kettering City School District
      • Fairmont High School, Kettering (the Firebirds)
        • (merger of the former Fairmont East and Fairmont West high schools (the East Falcons and the West Dragons)
    • Miamisburg City Schools
      • Miamisburg High School, Miamisburg (the Vikings)
    • Northmont City Schools
      • Northmont High School, Clayton (the Thunderbolts)
    • Oakwood City School District
      • Oakwood High School, Oakwood (the Lumberjacks)
    • Trotwood-Madison City Schools
      • Trotwood-Madison High School, Trotwood (the Rams)
    • Vandalia Butler City Schools
      • Butler High School, Vandalia (the Aviators)
    • West Carrollton Schools
      • West Carrollton Senior High School, West Carrollton (the Pirates)
  • Carlisle High School, Carlisle (the Indians)

Private schools

The following private high schools are located in Montgomery County:

  • Archbishop Alter High School, Kettering (the Knights) (Roman Catholic)
  • Carroll High School, Dayton (the Patriots) (Roman Catholic)
  • Chaminade Julienne High School, Dayton (Eagles) (Roman Catholic/Marianist)
  • Dayton Christian High School, Dayton (the Warriors) (nondenominational Christian)
  • Miami Valley School, Dayton (the Rams) (nonsectarian)
  • Spring Valley Academy, Centerville (Seventh-day Adventist)

Communities

Montgomerytownships.PNG

Downtown Dayton, the largest city in Montgomery County

Cities

  • Brookville
  • Centerville (partly in Greene County)
  • Clayton
  • Dayton (county seat)
  • Englewood
  • Germantown
  • Huber Heights (partly in Miami County)
  • Kettering (partly in Greene County)
  • Miamisburg
  • Moraine
  • Oakwood
  • Riverside
  • Springboro (mostly in Warren County)
  • Trotwood
  • Union (mostly in Montgomery County)
  • Vandalia
  • West Carrollton

Villages

  • Carlisle (mostly in Warren County)
  • Farmersville
  • New Lebanon
  • Phillipsburg
  • Verona (mostly in Preble County)

Townships

  • Butler
  • Clay
  • German
  • Harrison
  • Jackson
  • Jefferson
  • Miami
  • Perry
  • Washington

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Defunct townships

  • Dayton
  • Mad River (remnant merged with the Village of Riverside in 1994)
  • Madison (remnant merged with the Village of Trotwood in 1996)
  • Randolph (remnant merged with the Village of Clayton in 1998)
  • Van Buren (partitioned between the municipalities of Kettering and Moraine in 1952-1953)[17]
  • Wayne (incorporated as Huber Heights in 1981)

Census-designated place

  • Drexel

Other unincorporated communities

  • Airhill
  • Amity
  • Arlington
  • Bachman
  • Chautauqua
  • Dodson
  • Fort McKinley
  • Harries
  • Kinsey
  • Liberty
  • Little York
  • Miami Villa
  • Morgan Place
  • New Chicago
  • Northridge
  • Pyrmont
  • Shiloh
  • Spanker
  • Taylorsburg
  • Woodbourne-Hyde Park

See also

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Montgomery County, Ohio

References

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Montgomery County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Montgomery.pdf. 
  2. ^ 2020 census
  3. ^ "Ohio 2010 Census Population For Counties". http://www.development.ohio.gov/research/documents/RevisedCounties2010.pdf. 
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  5. ^ "Montgomery County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39113&sid=0. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  11. ^ 2020 census
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39113. 
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39113. 
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39113. 
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39113. 
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  17. ^ "The City of Moraine -". http://www.ci.moraine.oh.us/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=23&Itemid=102. 

External links

Coordinates: 39°45′N 84°17′W / 39.75, -84.29

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