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Ludovico Arroyo Bañas was born 16 February 1901 in Merced, Banate, Iloilo, Philippines to Celestino Bañas y Barboza and Francisca Arroyo and died 27 June 1979 in 644 Divinagracia St., La Paz, Iloilo City, Iloilo, Philippines of unspecified causes. He married Carmen Jalandoni Jover (1910-1992) in La Paz Catholic Church, La Paz, Iloilo, Philippines.


Ludovico Arroyo Bañas (16 February 1901 – 27 June 1979) was a high official of the Philippine Bureau of Telecommunications (currently called National Telecommunications Commission) who was one of the local American-trained pioneers in Telecommunications service in the Philippines during the American Regime in the Country[1] and who, through his professional specialization and expertise, made some significant contribution in the liberation of the Philippines during the World War II, in the field of communications.

Service in the Bureau of Telecommunications in the Philippines

During the American Regime, Ludovico Arroyo Bañas started in the government service as a Grade V teacher in Valladolid, Negros Occidental, on 1 January 1919. Later, he transferred to the Bureau of Posts as a student operator in the Posts-Telegraph School. After passing a competitive examination for penionados whrein he ranked among the first ten in a group of 398 candidates, he was sent with the first and only and only batch of pensionados to undergo advanced training in wireless telegraphy (radio), at the United States Naval Radio School in Sangley Point Cavite, on 15 August 1919. [2] The training of the ten Filipinos was made possible through a special arrangement between the US Naval authorities in the Philippines and the Insular Government. To select the trainees, a special examination was conducted among the 398 students of the Bureau of Posts' Telegraph School.[3] [4][5]


Cavite City skyline 1899.jpg
Ludovico Arroyo Bañas.jpg
Left to right: [1] Photo of the skyline of the old Port City of Cavite in 1899 (shortly after the American takeover of the port), taken from a ship docked at the Naval shipyard, with the churches visible at maximum resolution.; [2] Photo of Ludovico Arroyo Bañas (center), Philippine Bureau of Telecommunications Superintendent for Region IV, with his staff (c. late 1950's), including Francisco Brillantes (1892-1981), the father of Eduardo Brillantes (1937-2006), his future son in law and husband of his daughter Maja.

After graduating with distinction, Bañas was assigned to Radio Puerto Princessa, Palawan and, later, he was transferred to Radio Culion (also in Palawan). Six years later, on 22 December 1921, he was reassigned in Iloilo, where he was promoted to the office of Assistant Radio Inspector and, after a few months, to the rank of Chief operator until the World War II broke out in 1942. On several occasions, he was also concurrently designated as Assistant Radio Inspector or Acting Radio Inspector for the Port of Iloilo.[6] [7]

After serving the U.S. Army Forces Far East (USAFFE) during the war, Bañas left the military service in 1945, with the rank of Second Lieutenant. He went back to Telecommunications service (this time under the Philippine Republic) in April 1946, as Chief Operator of the Bureau of Posts in Iloilo City. Later, he became the Regional Superintendent of the Bureau of Telecommunications (BUTEL) in Region IV (Panay, Negros, Romblon, and Palawan)[8][9] He was promoted to this position left vacant by Mr. Mariano Tolentino, on 11 December 1957, bringing with him a long experience in Telecommunications service.[10] He occupied this post until the time of his retirement at the age of sixty-five years, on 16 February 1966,[11] [12]after forty-seven years of continuous service since 1 April 1919.[13][14] He died on 27 June 1979.

Military Service during the World War II

At the beginning of the War (on 10 October 1941 ), Ludovico Arroyo Bañas was drafted in the Civilian Employee Warning Service of the United States of America (Iloilo City Station), under the command of Major Campbell. This task was short-lived for on 2 January 1942, he was inducted to the USAFFE, in Sta. Barbara, Iloilo by Lt. Col Crispen Gorriceta. From 4 January to 16 April 1942, he was assigned as Radio Officer (with the rank of Second Lieutenant) of the 64th Infantry Regiment, of the 61st Division, Philippine Army, stationed in Sta. Barbara.[15] Lt. Col Amos Francia, who was in command of the unit, disbanded his men on 17 April of that same year. That forced Bañas to go home to Banate, Iloilo, where he farmed his land.[16]

Ludovico Arroyo Banas with Family

Ludovico Arroyo Bañas with the family of his wife Carmen Jalandoni Jover during a clan gathering sometime in 1950s. Ludovico is behind his wife Carmen (standing, fourth from the left), while Iloilo City Mayor Dominador Jalandoni Jover (also standing) could be found fourth from the right.

Lack of equipment, difficult terrain and undeveloped infrastructure made coordination of the groups of disbanded USAFFE forces nearly impossible, and for several months in 1942 all contact with Philippine resistance forces was lost. Communications were restored in November 1942 when the reformed 6th Military District in Panay island, led by Colonel Macario Peralta, was reorganized.

Upon the reorganization of the 6th Military District in Panay, Ludovico Arroyo Bañas again joined the defense of his Country, and worked with Capt. Eliseo Espia in the Signal Company of the 61st Division (stationed in Passi, Iloilo), on the 5th of that month. Later, he was sent to the Signal Company of the 64th Infantry Regiment of same Military District, under the Command of Lt. Col. Cesar Hechanova, where he served until the end of the war.[17]

2Lt Ludovico Arroyo Bañas distinguished himself as a member of the Filipino forces during the war, in the field of communication. He was responsible in successfully making the first radio contact with the Allied Forces, months after the United States Armed Forces was disbanded in the Philippines. He, together with his team, used a home made-made transmitter in establishing the first two-way radio contact with the United States in November 1943,[18][19] affirming the continuous existence of Filipino resistance forces against the Japanese, thereby providing the joint and combined U.S. and Philippine Commonwealth military forces important data for the liberation of the Philippines. This enabled the forwarding of intelligence regarding Japanese forces in the Philippines to SWPA command, as well as the consolidating the once sporadic guerrilla activities, thereby allowing the guerrillas to help in the war effort.[20]

Other Personal Achievements, Family and Marriage

Ludovico was one of the three sons of Celestino Barboza Bañas and Francisca Arroyo, both were native and residents of Banate, Iloilo, Philippines. His siblings were Martin and Maximo. He was married to Carmen Jalandoni Jover - sister of Dominador Jalandoni Jover, who was Mayor of Iloilo City. The couple had seven daughters (Thelma, Alsina, Maja, Emma, Manajama, Nancy, and Francily) and a son (Richard).[21][22]


At the end of his service to the Philippine Government, Bañas was holding a first class radio-telegraph operator license, as well as a radio-telegraph civil service eligibility. He was also designated by the National Civil Defense Administration as the Chief of Telecommunications Service in Iloilo City.[23]

Service Medals and Ribbons[24]

Suggested Further Readings

References

  1. ^ Cf.Federico A. Oquindo and Rafael R. Oquindo, History of the Philippine Telecommunications Industry (cf. (cf. http://raflor.tripod.com/). N. B. Federico A. Oquindo was a senior executive assistant and head of the Public Information Office of the National Telecommunications Commission, prior to his retirement from Philippine Gevernment Service in 1988. At the time of his retirement from the government service in 1988, FEDERICO A. OQUINDO was a senior executive assistant and head of the Public Information Office of the National Telecommunications Commission...Prior to joining the NTC in 1980, he served with the Bureau of Telecommunications (which he joined in 1947 as messenger) as that agency’s public relations officer and editor of the bureau’s official publication... In writing this short history of Philippine Telecommunications, he consulted records and interviewed old timers and even retirees of the government telegraph service some of whom claimed that their earliest years in the service date back to the defunct telegraph division of the Constabulary during the early years of the American occupation... A free lance writer, the author has written numerous articles, short stories and other works some of which appeared in such national publications like the pre-Martial Law Philippines Free Press, Graphic Magazine, Manila Daily Bulletin, Liwayway Magazine, Nation Magazine, Sunday Times Magazine, Saturday Mirror Magazine, Taliba, Orient Magazine and certain trade journals. He also edited trade and technical magazines and publications of professional organizations and a national labor federation...He has attended numerous seminars and workshops in public relations and communications as well as in trade unionism both here and abroad...Rafael Oquendo, on the other hand, was also a former employee of NTC, once a technical staff of the Rajah Broadcasting Network better known as DZRJ, has attended numerous trainings and seminars both locally and abroad. Presently, he is a full time faculty member of the Polytechnic University of the Philippines under the College of Engineering.... As regards the reliability of the information, it is good to consider Rafael R. Oquendo's note, which says: This is a first attempt to chronicle the growth development of the Philippines’ telecommunications Industry... Being an Initial effort some quarters may find this volume wanting in certain respects. However, the author- believes that a start has to be made if the Philippine telecommunications story will ever be written... As will be noted a good portion of this work focuses on the role of the government In the industry’s development. It was only during the post-World War II years that private capital ventured into this field particularly In the domestic record carrier sector. The international services sector has, of course, always been dominated by multinationals since way back...The idea of writing the history of the country’s Telecommunications sector was first conceived in 1965. The plan then was to prepare a volume to commemorate the first centennial of Philippine telecommunications, which was to have been marked in 1967. However, various factors came in the way so that nothing concrete came out of that plan... Nevertheless the author continued working on his manuscript over the years adding more details and information to what were already contained in his original draft. Valuable information were provided by various parties which included telecom companies, radio amateurs, old timers and even retirees from the government telegraph service some of whom, he learned were among those whose services date back to the defunct telegraph division of the Constabulary during the early 1900a. Most of them, sad to say, have since crossed the Great Divide... Also consulted were records both government and private. The information provided by the authors who know the actual persons and documents related to the History of Telecommunications in the Philippines (which, unfortunately, a subject about which scarcely anyone wrote something) cannot just be easily dismissed as unreliable unless someone, with a more plausible and reliable evidences, can demonstrate the contrary. The authors' website provide details of their current status, at least for Rafael Oquendo who is currently serving as full-time teacher at the College of Engineering of the Polytechnic University of the Philippines. Their contact details are also provided, for purposes of verification. Nonetheless, it is true that the documents mentioned in the write up needs to be specified.
  2. ^ Cf. Policarpio Y. Cuanico, Bañas in Personality Section, The Telecom News, 31 March 1959, page missing.
  3. ^ Cf. Telecom Standouts in The Telecom News, 31 March 1959, p. 2.
  4. ^ Telecom Standout in The Telecom News, Philippines: 31 March 1959, p.2.
  5. ^ Federico A. Oquindo and Rafael R. Oquindo, History of the Philippine Telecommunications Industry (cf. http://raflor.tripod.com/).
  6. ^ Cf. Policarpio Y. Cuanico, Bañas in Personality Section, The Telecom News, 31 March 1959, page missing.
  7. ^ Officer's and Warrant Officer's Qualification Card of 2Lt. Ludovico Arroyo Bañas O-26746 PA, dated 27 March 1946, signed by 1Lt Quirico Mijares INF. The Document can be found in the Non-current Records of the Office of the Adjutant General of the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Camp General Emilio Aguinaldo, Quezon City.
  8. ^ Cf. Telecom Standouts in The Telecom News, 31 March 1959, p. 2.
  9. ^ Federico A. Oquindo and Rafael R. Oquindo, History of the Philippine Telecommunications Industry (cf. http://raflor.tripod.com/).
  10. ^ Cf. Policarpio Y. Cuanico, Bañas in Personality Section, The Telecom News, 31 March 1959, p.age missing.
  11. ^ F. Oquendo and R. Oquendo placed the approximate date of retirement of Bañas in the late 1950s (cf. http://raflor.tripod.com/). However, an autographed picture of Bañas (dated 20 February 1966), given by the subject to his daughter Maja (cf. photograph at the talk page of this article), indicates the exact date (16 February 1966).
  12. ^ Back of an autographed picture of Ludovico Arroyo Bañas (dated 20 February 1966), given by the subject to his daughter Maja.
  13. ^ Cf. Telecom Standouts in The Telecom News, 31 March 1959, p. 2.
  14. ^ Cf. Back of an autographed picture of Ludovico Arroyo Bañas (dated 20 February 1966), given by the subject to his daughter Maja.
  15. ^ Cf. Telecom Standouts in The Telecom News, 31 March 1959, p. 2.
  16. ^ Affidavit H18179, 6th Military District, Unit Number T-8, Province of Iloilo (for USAFFE Guerilla), dated 9 January 1946, signed at OTC, Sta. Barbara, Iloilo, Philippines by 2Lt Samuel L. Bell O-1329677, Summary Court Officer, US Processing Team No. 8. The Document can be found in the Non-current Records of the Office of the Adjutant General of the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Camp General Emilio Aguinaldo, Quezon City.
  17. ^ Affidavit H18179, 6th Military District, Unit Number T-8, Province of Iloilo (for USAFFE Guerilla), dated 9 January 1946, signed at OTC, Sta. Barbara, Iloilo, Philippines by 2Lt Samuel L. Bell O-1329677, Summary Court Officer, US Processing Team No. 8. The Document can be found in the Non-current Records of the Office of the Adjutant General of the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Camp General Emilio Aguinaldo, Quezon City.
  18. ^ Policarpio Y. Cuanico, Bañas in Personality Section, The Telecom News, Philippines: 31 March 1959, p.missing.
  19. ^ This was also the same testimony of retired Col. Eliseo S. Espia PA (the Capt. Eliseo S. Espia, with whom 2Lt Bañas worked during the war) in an interview made by Capt John Bañas Brillantes, at Col. Espia's home near Gate 6, Camp General Emilio Aguinaldo, Q.C., on 4 March 2007. That time, the World War II Veteran was already 87 years old, but was still lucid in his judgment and memory, and could still walk.
  20. ^ Dolan 1991-21
  21. ^ Cf. Policarpio Y. Cuanico, Bañas in Personality Section, The Telecom News, 31 March 1959, page missing.
  22. ^ Policarpio Y. Cuanico, Bañas in Personality Section, The Telecom News, Philippines: 31 March 1959, p.missing.
  23. ^ Policarpio Y. Cuanico, Bañas in Personality Section, The Telecom News, Philippines: 31 March 1959, p.missing.
  24. ^ Officer's and Warrant Officer's Qualification Card of 2Lt. Ludovico Arroyo Bañas O-26746 PA, dated 27 March 1946, signed by 1Lt Quirico Mijares INF. The Document can be found in the Non-current Records of the Office of the Adjutant General of the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Camp General Emilio Aguinaldo, Quezon City.

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This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Ludovico Arroyo Bañas . The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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