Adair history.jpg

The Ninety-Six District was the westernmost judicial district of South Carolina before it was organized into counties in 1785. Per James Adair (Historian) it was so named because of it's distance in miles to the Cherokee Settlements.[1]

Primary Disambiguation[edit | edit source]

James Adair[edit | edit source]

James Adair - full disambiguation for his name


  1. James Adair (1714-1796) (Indian Historian) - pioneer, indian trader, cooper, patriot, Scotch-Irish immigrant - James Adair spent 30 years visiting the indians and collecting meticulous notes for his book: History of the American Indians. Originally published in London in 1775.
  2. James Adair (1748-1818) (James 1748) - Son of James Adair (Historian), md Hannah?. Found on pg 13 - 1790 US Census (1 son / 5 females in household)
  3. James Adair (1752-1818) (James 1752) - Per Gravestone in Duncan Creek, but NOT son of Joseph. Who are his parents??? Md Hannah?
  4. James Adair (1770-1840) (James 1770) - Grandson of James, Indian Historian
  5. James Adair (1747-1831) (James 1747, Indiana Migrant 1800) - Son of Joseph Adair, Scotch-Irish Immigrant, md Rebecca Montgomery / Pg 12 - 1790 US Census (7 Females in Household)

John Adair[edit | edit source]

Gov John Adair

John Adair - full disambiguation for this name

  1. John Adair (1757-1840) - 8th Governor of Kentucky, Veteran of War of 1812. Son of William Adair from Chester Co, SC.
  2. John Adair (1754-1815) (John 1754) - Son of James Adair (Historian).
  3. John Adair Sener]; -- Killed in 1782, wife Sarah. Abbe. Wills, p. 10. Cannot trace to other Adairs? Recent SC Immigrant? Signer on Col Williams Petition.

Joseph Adair[edit | edit source]

South Carolina 1790 US Federal Census has two entries for Joseph Adair. Both entries show on page 13 of the Laurens County Census.

Joseph Adair - full disambiguation for his name

  1. Joseph Adair (1711-1788) (Joseph 1711, Immigrant), Cooper, landed in Pennsylvania and moved to Laurens County, South Carolina by 1761.
  2. Joseph Adair (1745-1820) (Joseph 1745) - Son of James Adair (Historian) - married Sarah Lowe
  3. Joseph Adair (1735-1812) (Joseph 1735) - Son of Joseph 1711. Md Sarah Dillard.

Joseph Adair Family Memorial: Duncans Creek[edit | edit source]

JosAdair1.jpg

Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Laurens County, South Carolina Note: This is a memorial, but not an actual gravestone.
IN MEMORY OF JOSEPH ADAIR, SR. BORN IRELAND 1711 - DIED S.C. 1789
ELDER OF DUNCAN CREEK CHURCH - 40 YRS, AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY PATRIOT
HIS WIFE SARAH LAFERTY OF PA, B. c1715 - D. c1770
THEIR SONS JOSEPH JR., JAMES & BENJAMIN ALL WERE REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS
THEIR DAUGHTERS JEAN RAMAGE, SARAH ADAIR,
*MARY OWENS & *ROBERT LONG
SECOND WIFE SUSANNA LONG
* STEPCHILDREN

William Adair[edit | edit source]

William Adair - full disambiguation for his name

  1. William Adair (c1718-1812) - brother of James Adair, settled circa 1754 into Fishing Creek, Chester County, South Carolina.
  2. [William Adair]; - died 1780-84. Estate administered 1784, Abbe. Wills, p. 10. (Signer of Col Williams Petition?)

Robert Adair[edit | edit source]

Ashpole Church Memorial[edit | edit source]

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Located in front of Ashpole Presbyterian Church in Rowland, North Carolina is a large memorial stone tribute to James Robert Adair, listing his exploits as pioneer physician, patriot of the revolutionary war and indian historian. No information on who put this stone here or why. FindAGrave attempts to link him to immigrant Thomas Adair, but GENI.com gives many reasons to thoroughly dispute this association. This spot is most likely the final grave of Robert Adair (1709-1783), no relation to our James Adair, but frequently confused with him.

Thomas Adair[edit | edit source]

Thomas Adair - full disambiguation for his name

  1. Thomas Adair (c1680-c1740) - Might(?) be the father of the three Adair boys that immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1730 and then later moved to South Carolina by 1760.

Research Notes[edit | edit source]

1779 William Petition[edit | edit source]

Colonel Williams Memorial Petition (dated 03-Sept-1779) was a special effort during American Revolutionary War by the officers and soldiers of the Little River District Militia Regiment of South Carolina who had served under his command. Because of severe political turmoil in the Little River District, many false rumors were spread about the loyalists about Col Williams, the unit commander. The list of signatories on this petition is an historical list of the prominent Patriot leaders in this district.

1790 US Census[edit | edit source]

Significant Locations[edit | edit source]

Adairsville, Georgia[edit | edit source]

Adairsville, Georgia is a city in Bartow County, Georgia, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 4,648. Adairsville is approximately halfway between Atlanta and Chattanooga on Interstate 75. Adairsville used to be a small Cherokee village named after Chief Walter (John) S. Adair, grandson of James Adair, historian, who married a Cherokee Indian woman before the removal of the Cherokee in 1838. It was part of the Cherokee territory along with Calhoun and including New Echota.

Adair, Oklahoma[edit | edit source]

Adair, Oklahoma is a town established in 1883 in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 790 at the 2010 census, compared to 704 at the 2000 census. It opened a Cherokee school. Adair is named after two Cherokee brothers, William Penn Adair (1830-1880), a politician and jurist (and namesake for Will Rogers), and Dr. Walter Thompson Adair. Site of the daring Dalton Gang great train robbery in 1892 when eight members held up the Missouri-Kansas-Texas train at Adair, Indian Territory (IT).

Adair County, Oklahoma[edit | edit source]

Adair County, Oklahoma is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,286. Its county seat is Stilwell. Adair County was named after the Adair family of the Cherokee tribe. One source says that the county was specifically named for Watt Adair, one of the first Cherokees to settle in the area.


Search using Semantic MediaWiki[edit | edit source]

(Results may include any of the above.)

First name match
 Birth placeDeath placeFatherMotherJoined with
James Adair (1781-1862)Laurens County, South Carolina, United StatesLaurens County, South Carolina, United StatesJames Adair (1748-1818)Delilah Eliza Holland (1783-1864)
James Adair (1714-1796)County Antrim, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom (Ulster)Laurens County, South Carolina, United StatesThomas Adair (c1680-c1740)Eleanor Adair (1726-1803)
James W Adair (1826-)Green County, KentuckyEdmond Adair (1814-1895)Susan Dillard (1813-1885)Elizabeth Little (1836-1906) + Frances S Nelson (1846-1914)
James Adair (1770-1840)Laurens County, South Carolina, United StatesPickens County, Alabama, United StatesJoseph Adair (1745-1820)Sarah Lowe (1750-1844)Rebecca Unknown Adair (c1775-)
James Adair (1752-1818)Clinton, Laurens County, South Carolina, United StatesLaurens County, South Carolina, United StatesHannah Adair (1750-1826)
James Adair (1747-1831)Pennsylvania, United StatesBrookville, Franklin County, Indiana, United StatesJoseph Adair (1711-1788)Sarah Laferty (1715-1767)Rebecca Montgomery (1750-1835)
James Adair (1748-1818)Chickasaw NationLaurens County, South CarolinaJames Adair (1714-1796)Eleanor Adair (1726-1803)Hannah Unknown (1750-1826)
Middle name match

No person has that first name as sole middle name with that surname

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Wikipedia may have more than one relevant page and may in future have more information of genealogical interest about
James Adair in the Ninety-Six District; check from time to time and copy as desired.

More detail of some[edit | edit source]

(Details from census and other records can help distinguish.)

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

Many Adair family burials are found at the following locations:

References[edit | edit source]

  1. ^ History of the American Indians by James Adair. Pg 113

See also[edit | edit source]

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