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This article is about the European aristocratic dynasty. For the former state ruled by this dynasty, the Countship and later Duchy of Nassau, see Nassau (state). For other uses, see Nassau (disambiguation)
Arms of Nassau

Arms of Nassau: Azure billetty or, a lion rampant of the last armed and langued gules

The House of Nassau is a diversified aristocratic dynasty in Europe. It is named after the lordship associated with Nassau Castle, located in present-day Nassau, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. The lords of Nassau were originally titled Count of Nassau, then elevated to the princely class as princely counts. At the end of the Holy Roman Empire, they proclaimed themselves Dukes of Nassau, forming the independent state Nassau in what is now the German states of Rhineland-Palatinate and Hesse. The duchy was annexed by Prussia in 1866, when it was incorporated into the new Province of Hesse-Nassau. Today Nassau is a geographical, historical and cultural region in Germany.

All Dutch monarchs since 1890 and the Grand Dukes of Luxembourg since 1912 have been descended in the female line from the House of Nassau. According to German tradition, the family name is passed only in the male line of succession. The house is therefore, from this perspective, extinct since 1985.[1] However Dutch aristocratic customs (and Luxembourg's, which are based on the aforementioned) differ, and do not consider the House extinct. The Grand Duke of Luxembourg uses "Duke of Nassau" as his secondary title and a title of pretense.

Origins Edit

Count Dudo-Henry of Laurenburg (ca. 1060 – ca. 1123) is considered the founder of the House of Nassau. He is first mentioned in the purported founding-charter of Maria Laach Abbey in 1093 (although many historians consider the document to be fabricated). The Castle Laurenburg, located a few miles upriver from Nassau on the Lahn, was the seat of his lordship. His family probably descended from the Lords of Lipporn. In 1159, Nassau Castle became the ruling seat, and the house is now named after this castle.

The Counts of Laurenburg and Nassau expanded their authority under the brothers Robert (Ruprecht) I (1123–1154) and Arnold I of Laurenburg (1123–1148). Robert was the first person to call himself Count of Nassau, but the title was not confirmed until 1159, five years after Robert's death. Robert's son Walram I (1154–1198) was the first person to be legally titled Count of Nassau.

The chronology of the Counts of Laurenburg is not certain and the link between Robert I and Walram I is especially controversial. Also, some sources consider Gerhard, listed as co-Count of Laurenburg in 1148, to be the son of Robert I's brother, Arnold I.[2] However, Erich Brandenburg in his Die Nachkommen Karls des Großen states that it is most likely that Gerhard was Robert I's son, because Gerard was the name of Beatrix of Limburg's maternal grandfather.[3]

Counts of Laurenburg (ca. 1093–1159)Edit

  • ca. 1060 – ca. 1123: Dudo-Henry
  • 1123–1154: Robert (Ruprecht) I - son of Dudo-Henry
  • 1123–1148: Arnold I - son of Dudo-Henry
  • 1148: Gerhard - son (probably) of Robert I
  • 1151–1154: Arnold II - son of Robert I
  • 1154–1159: Robert II - son of Robert I

Counts of Nassau (1159–1255)Edit

In 1255, Henry II's sons, Walram II and Otto I, split the Nassau possessions. The descendants of Walram became known as the Walram Line, which became important in the Countship of Nassau and Luxembourg. The descendants of Otto became known as the Ottonian Line, which would inherit parts of Nassau, France and the Netherlands. Both lines would often themselves be divided over the next few centuries. In 1783, the heads of various branches of the House of Nassau sealed the Nassau Family Pact (Erbverein) to regulate future succession in their states.

The Walram Line (1255–1344)Edit

Walram Nassau wapen

Arms and crest of the Walram line

Counts of Nassau in Wiesbaden, Idstein, and Weilburg (1255–1344)Edit

  • 1255–1276: Walram II
  • 1276–1298: Adolf of Nassau, crowned King of Germany in 1292
  • 1298–1304: Robert VI of Nassau
  • 1298–1324: Walram III, Count of Nassau in Wiesbaden, Idstein, and Weilnau
  • 1298–1344: Gerlach I, Count of Nassau in Wiesbaden, Idstein, Weilburg, and Weilnau

After Gerlach's death, the possessions of the Walram line were divided into Nassau-Weilburg and Nassau-Wiesbaden-Idstein.

Nassau-Weilburg (1344–1816)Edit

Flag of the House of Nassau Weilburg

Flag of Nassau-Weilburg

Count Walram II began the Countship of Nassau-Weilburg, which existed to 1816. The sovereigns of this house afterwards governed the Duchy of Nassau until 1866 and from 1890 the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. The branch of Nassau-Weilburg ultimately became rulers of Luxembourg. The Walram line received the lordship of Merenberg in 1328 and Saarbrücken (by marriage) in 1353.

Counts of Nassau-Weilburg (1344–1688)Edit

Princely counts of Nassau-Weilburg (1688–1816)Edit

Dukes of Nassau (1816–1866)Edit

In 1866, Prussia annexed the Duchy of Nassau as the duke had been an ally of Austria in the Second Austro-Prussian War. In 1890, Duke Adolf would become Grand Duke Adolphe of Luxembourg.

Grand Dukes of Luxembourg (from the House of Nassau-Weilburg) - 1890–1912 and succession through a female onwardsEdit

From a morganatic marriage, contracted in 1868, descends a family, see Count of Merenberg, which in 1907 was declared non-dynastic. Had they not been excluded from the succession, they would have inherited the headship of the house in 1912.

Counts of Nassau-Wiesbaden-Idstein (1344–1728)Edit

After Frederick Louis's death, Nassau-Wiesbaden-Idstein fell to Charles, Prince of Nassau-Usingen

Counts of Nassau-Saarbrücken (1429–1797) Edit

After Henry Louis's death, Nassau-Saarbrücken fell to Charles William, Prince of Nassau-Usingen

Princes of Nassau-Usingen (1659–1816)Edit

In 1816, Nassau-Usingen merged with Nassau-Weilburg to form the Duchy of Nassau. See "Dukes of Nassau" above.

The Ottonian LineEdit

Otto Nassau wapen

Arms and crest of the Ottonian line (since the 13th century)

  • 1255–1290: Otto I, Count of Nassau in Siegen, Dillenburg, Beilstein, and Ginsberg
  • 1290–1303: Joint rule by Henry, John and Emicho I, sons of Otto I

In 1303, Otto's sons divided the possessions of the Ottonian line. Henry received Nassau-Siegen, John received Nassau-Dillenburg and Emicho I received Nassau-Hadamar. After John's death. Nassau-Dillenburg fell to Henry.

Counts of Nassau-Dillenburg Edit

In 1739, Nassau-Dillenburg fell to Nassau-Dietz, a.k.a. Orange-Nassau.

Counts of Nassau-Beilstein Edit

In 1343, Nassau-Beilstein was split off from Nassau-Dillenburg.

After John III's death, Nassau-Beilstein fell back to Nassau-Dillenburg. It was split off again in 1607 for George, who inherited the rest of Nassau-Dillenburg in 1620.

Counts and Princes of Nassau-HadamarEdit

  • 1303–1334: Emicho I, Count in Driedorf, Esterau, and Hadamar, married Anna of Nuremberg
  • 1334–1364: John, married Elisabeth of Waldeck
  • 1334–1359: Emicho II, son of Emicho I, married Anna of Dietz
  • 1364–1369: Henry, son of John, Count of Nassau-Hadamar
  • 1369–1394: Emicho III, son of John

After Emicho III's death, Nassau-Hadamar fell back to Nassau-Dillenburg.

In 1620, the younger line of Nassau-Hadamar was split off from Nassau-Dillenburg

In 1711, Nassau-Hadamar was divided between Nassau-Dietz, Nassau-Dillenburg, and Nassau-Siegen.

Nassau-SiegenEdit

The branch of Nassau-Siegen was a collateral line of the House of Nassau, and ruled in Siegen. The first Count of Nassau in Siegen was Count Henry, Count of Nassau in Siegen (d. 1343), the elder son of Count Otto I of Nassau. His son Count Otto II of Nassau ruled also in Dillenburg.

In 1328, John of Nassau-Dillenburg died unmarried and childless, and Dillenburg fell to Henry of Nassau-Siegen. For counts of Nassau-Siegen in between 1343 and 1606, see "Counts of Nassau-Dillenburg" above.

In 1606 the younger line of Nassau-Siegen was split off from the House of Nassau-Dillenburg. After the main line of the House became extinct in 1734, Emperor Charles VI transferred the county to the House of Orange-Nassau.

Counts and Princes of Nassau-SiegenEdit

Pałac Gozdzkich - de Nassau

Gozdzki - de Nassau Palace in Warsaw that belonged to wealthy Karolina Gozdzka (1747–1807) and her husband Charles Henry de Nassau-Siegen (1745–1808).[4]

In 1734, Nassau-Siegen fell to Nassau-Dietz, a.k.a. Orange-Nassau.

Counts and Princes of Nassau-Dietz Edit

Schilderij- H.Prins van Nassau -H.Prins van Nassau- Georg Prins van Nassau -Willem Prins van Nassau - Leeuwarden - 20130988 - RCE

Princes of the House of Nassau-Dietz from the Stadhouderlijk Hof of Paleis in Leeuwaarden, H.Prince of Nassau, Henry Casimir, Prince of Nassau, George, Prince of Nassau, and Willem Frederick, Prince of Nassau_Dietz

Orange-NassauEdit

The House of Orange-Nassau stems from the Ottonian Line. The connection was via Engelbert I, who offered his services to the Duke of Burgundy, married a Dutch noblewoman and inherited lands in the Netherlands, with the barony of Breda as the core of his Dutch possessions.

Wilhelm1Nassau

William I. "the Silent" (1545–1584), founder of the Netherlands, statue at Wiesbaden

The importance of the Nassaus grew throughout the 15th and 16th century. Henry III of Nassau-Breda was appointed stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland and Utrecht by Emperor Charles V in the beginning of the 16th century. Henry was succeeded by his son, René of Châlon-Orange in 1538, who was, as can be inferred from his name, a Prince of Orange. When René died prematurely on the battlefield in 1544 his possessions and the princely title passed to his cousin, William the Silent, a Count of Nassau-Dillenburg. By dropping the suffix name "Dillenburg" (of the Orange-Nassau-Dillenburg), from then on the family members called themselves "Orange-Nassau."

With the death of William III, the legitimate direct male line of William the Silent became extinct and thereby the first House of Orange-Nassau. John William Friso, the senior agnatic descendant of William the Silent's brother and a cognatic descendant of Frederick Henry, grandfather of William III, inherited the princely title and all the possessions in the low countries and Germany, but not the Principality of Orange itself. The Principality was ceded to France under the Treaty of Utrecht that ended the wars with King Louis XIV. John William Friso, who also was the Prince of Nassau-Dietz, founded thereby the second House of Orange-Nassau (the suffix name "Dietz" was dropped of the combined name Orange-Nassau-Dietz).

After the post-Napoleonic reorganization of Europe, the head of House of Orange-Nassau gained the title "King/Queen of the Netherlands".

Princes of OrangeEdit

House of Orange-Nassau(-Dillenburg), first creationEdit
  • 1544–1584: William I, also Count of Katzenelnbogen, Vianden, Dietz, Buren and Leerdam and Lord of IJsselstein
  • 1584–1618: Philip William, also Count of Nassau-Dillenburg, Count of Vianden, Buren and Leerdam and Lord of IJsselstein
  • 1618–1625: Maurice, also Count of Nassau-Dillenburg, Count of Vianden, Buren and Leerdam and Lord of IJsselstein
  • 1625–1647: Frederick Henry, also Count of Nassau-Dillenburg, Count of Vianden, Buren and Leerdam and Lord of IJsselstein
  • 1647–1650: William II, also Count of Nassau-Dillenburg, Count of Vianden, Buren and Leerdam and Lord of IJsselstein
  • 1650–1702: William III, also Count of Nassau-Dillenburg, Count of Vianden, Buren and Leerdam, Lord of IJsselstein and (from 1689) King of England, Scotland, and Ireland

In 1702, the Orange-Nassau-Dillenburg line died out and its possessions fell to the Nassau-Dietz line.

House of Orange-Nassau(-Dietz), second creationEdit
  • 1702–1711: John William Friso, also Prince of Nassau-Dietz, Count of Vianden, Buren and Leerdam and Lord of IJsselstein
  • 1711–1751: William IV, also Prince of Nassau-Dietz, Count of Vianden, Buren and Leerdam and Lord of IJsselstein
  • 1751–1806: William V, also Prince of Nassau-Dietz, Count of Vianden, Buren and Leerdam and Lord of IJsselstein
  • 1806–1815: William VI, also Prince of Fulda and Count of Corvey, Weingarten and Dortmund; in 1815 became King William I of the Netherlands
Royal coat of arms of the Netherlands

Royal Coat of Arms of the Netherlands

Kings and Queens of the Netherlands (from the House of Orange-Nassau-Dietz)Edit

  • 1815–1840: William I, also Duke and Grand Duke of Luxemburg and Duke of Limburg
  • 1840–1849: William II, also Grand Duke of Luxemburg and Duke of Limburg
  • 1849–1890: William III, also Grand Duke of Luxemburg and Duke of Limburg
  • 1890–1948: Wilhelmina

Following German laws, the House of Orange-Nassau(-Dietz) has been extinct since the death of Wilhelmina (1962). Dutch laws and the Dutch nation do not consider it extinct.

Family TreeEdit

The following family tree is compiled from Wikipedia and the reference cited in the note[5]

 
 
 
 
 
Dudo-Henry of Laurenburg
(German: Dudo-Heinrich)
(ca. 1060 – ca. 1123)
was Count of Laurenburg in 1093
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robert I of Nassau
(German: Ruprecht)
(ca. 1090 – ca. 1154)
was from 1123
co-Count of Laurenburg
later title himself
1st Count of Nassau
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
 
 
 
Arnold I of Laurenburg
(died ca. 1148)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robert II (German: Ruprecht)
Count of Laurenburg
(1154-1158)(died ca. 1159)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
Walram I of Nassau
(French: Valéran)
(ca. 1146–1198)
was the first
(legally titled)
Count of Nassau
(1154-1198)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
Henry (Heinrich) I
co-Count of Nassau
(1160 - August 1167)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
 
Robert III, the Bellicose
German: Ruprecht der Streitbare
(died 1191)
co-Count of Nassau (1160-1191)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Henry (Heinrich) II, the Rich
Count of Nassau
(1180–1251)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
Robert (Ruprecht) IV
Count of Nassau
(1198–1230)
Teutonic Knight Teuton flag
(1230–1240)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
 
 
Herrmann
(d after 3 December 1240)
Canon of Mainz Cathedral
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Walram II of Nassau
(ca. 1220 - 1276)
the WALRAMIAN Branch
present-day rulers of Luxembourg
descend from him

Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
Robert (Ruprecht) V
d. before 1247
Teutonic Knight (1230–1240)Teuton flag
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
Otto I of Nassau
(reigned ca. 1247 - 1290)
the OTTONIAN branch
the present-day rulers of
the Netherlands descend from him

Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
John
(ca. 1230 - 1309)
Bishop-Elect of Utrecht (1267–1290)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adolf
(ca. 1255-1298)
King of Germany
(1292 - 1298)
Crown of Holy Roman Empire
Armoiries empereur Adolphe de Nassau
 
 
 
 
Henry
(d. 1343)
Count of Nassau in Siegen
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
Emich
(d. 7 June 1334)
Count of Nassau in Hadamar
extinct 1394
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
John
(d. 1328)
Count Nassau in Dillenburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ruprecht
(+ 1304)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
Gerlach I, Count of Nassau-Wiesbaden
(bef 1288 +1361)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
Walram III
Count of Nassau-Wiesbaden
 
Otto II
(c. 1305 – 1330/1331)
Count of Nassau-Dillenburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
 
Henry
(1307-1388)
Count of Nassau-Beilstein
ext. 1561
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Arms of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adolph
(1307 +1370)
Count of Nassau in
Wiesbaden-Idstein
ext 1605
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
John I
(1309 +1371)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Weilbourg
 
Rupert 'the Bellicose'
(c. 1340 +1390)
Count of Nassau-Sonnenberg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
John I
(1340 +1416)
Count of Nassau-Dillenburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Philip I
1368 +1429)
Count of Nassau in Weilburg,Saarbrücken, etc.
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Nassau-Saarbrücken 1381
 
 
Adolph
(1362 +1420)
Count of Nassau-Dillenburg-Dietz
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Dietz
 
John II "The Elder"
( +1443)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
Engelbert I
(c. 1370/80 +1442)
Count of Nassau, Baron of Breda
founder of the Netherlands Nassaus
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Nassau-Dillenburg 1420
 
John III "The Younger"
(+1430)
Count of Nassau in Siegen
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Philip II
(1418 +1492)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Philippe de Nassau-Sarrebrück (selon Gelre)
 
 
John II
(1423 +1472)
Count of Nassau-Saarbrücken
ext. 1574
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Philippe de Nassau-Sarrebrück (selon Gelre)
 
 
John IV (Jan)
(1410, +1475)
Count of Nassau-Dillenburg-Dietz
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Nassau-Dillenburg 1420
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Henry II
(1414 +1450)
Count of Nassau-Dillenburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John III
(1441 +1480)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Philippe de Nassau-Sarrebrück (selon Gelre)
 
 
Philip
(1443-1471)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
Engelbert II the Valorious
(1451 +1504)
Count of Nassau and Vianden, Baron of Breda(fr), Lek, Diest, Roosendaal en Nispen and Wouw
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Nassau-Dillenburg 1420
 
 
 
 
John V
(1455 +1516)
Count of Nassau in Dillenburg,Siegen,Hadamar,Herborn,Vianden,Dietz
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Dietz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
From here descends the House of Nassau-Weilburg
and the Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg
(see below also)'
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
From here descends the House of Orange-Nassau (see below also)


House of Orange and NassauEdit

A summary family tree of the House of Orange-Nassau [6] from the joining of the house of Nassau-Breda/Dillenburg and the House of Châlon-Arlay-Orange to the end of the Dutch Republic is shown below. The family spawned many famous statesmen and generals, including two of the acknowledged "first captains of their age", Maurice of Nassau and the Marshal de Turenne.

John V Count of Nassau-Dietz, 1455-1516, Stadholder of Gelderland
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Dietz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John IV Prince of Orange, 1475-1502
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Blason famille fr Chalon Orange
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William the Rich Count of Nassau-Dillenburg 1487- 1559
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
 
 
 
 
Henry III Count of Nassau-Breda 1483-1538
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Vianden
 
Claudia of Châlon 1498–1521
 
 
 
 
Philibert of Châlon, Prince of Orange, 1502-1530
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William I "the Silent" 1533-1584, Prince of Orange 1544, Stadholder of Holland, Zealand & Utrecht, assassinated by Spanish agent
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Willem van Oranje wapen
 
Louis 1538–1574 died in battle against Spain
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
Adolf 1540–1568, died in battle against Spain
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
Henry 1550-1574 died in battle against Spain
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
John VI "the Elder" 1535–1606, Stadholder of Gelderland
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
 
René of Châlon 1519–1544, Prince of Orange,1521
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Blason René de Nassau-Dillenbourg, Prince de Châlon-Orange
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Philip William 1554–1618, Prince of Orange, 1584
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Blason Nassau-Orange
 
Maurice 1567–1625, Prince of Orange,1618, Stadholder of Holland, Zealand, Utrecht, etc.
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Arms of Maurice or Nassau Prince of Orange
 
Frederick Henry 1584–1647, Prince of Orange, 1625, Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, & etc.
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Willem van Oranje wapen
 
Louise Juliana 1576-1644 married Frederick IV Elector Palatinefrom whom the British royal family descends
 
Elisabeth 1577-1642 married Henri de La Tour d'Auvergne, Duke of Bouillon
 
illeg.
Justinus van Nassau (1559 – 1631)
Admiral & General, Gov of Breda 1601-1625
Justinus van Nassau wapen
 
 
William Louis "Us Heit", Count of Nassau-Dillenburg 1560–1620, Stadtholder of Friesland, Groningen, and Drenthe
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
Ernst Casimir, Count of Nassau-Dietz 1573–1632, Stadtholder of Friesland, Groningen, and Drenthe
Nassau-Diez 1636 wapen
 
 
John VII "the Middle", Count of Nassau-Siegen, 1561–1623
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
illeg
William of Nassau (1601–1627), lord of de Lek
 
illeg
Louis of Nassau, Lord of De Lek and Beverweerd (1602– 1665)
Blason Nassau-LaLecq Beverweert Ouwerkerk Odijk
 
 
 
 
 
Frederick V, Elector Palatine, 1610 & King of Bohemia 1619-21
 
 
Henri de la Tour d'Auvergne, Vicomte de Turenne & Marshal-General of France 1611-1675
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles I, King of England 1625-1649
Crown of Saint Edward (Heraldry)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles II
Crown of Saint Edward (Heraldry)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William II 1626-1650,Prince of Orange & Stadholder of Holland, Zealand, etc, 1647
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Willem van Oranje wapen
 
Mary,Princess Royal
Coronet of a Child of the Sovereign
Royal Arms of England (1603-1707)
James II
Crown of Saint Edward (Heraldry)
Royal Arms of England (1603-1707)
 
Louise Henriette (1627-1667) married Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg descendants were Kings of Prussia and later German Emperors
 
illeg.
Frederick Nassau de Zuylestein (1608–1672)
general of the army, descendants were the Earls of Rochford in England
Blason Nassau-Zuylestein
 
 
Albertine Agnes(1634– 1696)
 
 
 
William Frederick,1613-1664 Count later Prince of Nassau-Dietz,Stadtholder of Friesland, Groningen and Drenthe
Nassau-Diez 1640 wapen
 
 
 
Henry Casimir I Count of Nassau-Dietz,1612–1640,Stadtholder of Friesland, Groningen and Drenthe
Nassau-Diez 1636 wapen
 
John Maurice "the Brazilian", Prince of Nassau-Siegen,1604–1679,gov. of Dutch Brazil, Field Marshal of the Dutch Army
Blason Nassau-Dillenbourg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William III 1650-1702,Prince of Orange 1650, Stadholder of Holland, Zealand, etc, 1672, King of England, 1689
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)Crown of Saint Edward (Heraldry)
Willem van Oranje wapenRoyal Arms of England (1694-1702)
 
Mary II of England
Crown of Saint Edward (Heraldry)
Royal Arms of England (1689-1694)
 
 
ceded claims to the lands of Orange to France in 1713, but kept right to use the title in its German form: currently Georg Friedrich, Prince of Prussia, "Prinz von Oranien"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Henry Casimir II, Prince of Nassau-Dietz,1657-1696,Stadtholder of Friesland, Groningen and Drenthe
Nassau-Diez 1640 wapen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John William Friso 1687-1711, appointed heir by William III, Prince of Orange, 1702, Stadholder of Friesland 1696
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Arms of Johan Willem Friso as Prince of Orange
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anne, Princess Royal of England
 
William IV 1711–1751, Prince of Orange, Stadholder of Holland, Zealand, etc. 1747
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Arms of Johan Willem Friso as Prince of Orange
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wilhelmina of Prussia
 
William V 1748–1806, Prince of Orange,1751 Stadholder of Holland, Zealand, etc. 1751-1795
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Arms of Johan Willem Friso as Prince of Orange
 
 
Carolina 1743–1787
 
Charles Christian, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg, 1735-1788
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Princess Louise of Orange-Nassau, 1770– 1819 married Karl, Hereditary Prince of Braunschweig(-Wolfenbuttel), son of Princess Augusta of Great Britain
 
Prince Frederick of Orange-Nassau, 1774–1799 an Austrian General, no issue
 
William VI, Fürst of Nassau-Orange-Fulda 1803–1806, Fürst of Nassau-Orange, Prince of Orange 1806
later
William I, King of the Netherlands 1815
Heraldic Royal Crown (Common)
Arms of Sovereign Prince William I of Orange
 
 
 
 
 
 
Frederick William, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg, 1768-1816
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Royal Family of the Netherlands, see next table below
 
 
 
 
 
 
William, Duke of Nassau, 1792-1839
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adolphe 1817–1905, Duke of Nassau 1839-1866,Grand Duke of Luxembourg, 1890-1905
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg


William I, 1772-1843, King of the Netherlands, 1815-1840
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Royal Arms of the Netherlands (1815-1907)
 
 
 
Wilhelmina of Prussia
Wappen Preußen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William II, 1792-1849, King of the Netherlands, 1840
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Royal Arms of the Netherlands (1815-1907)
 
Anna Pavlovna of Russia
Mali tsr
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prince Frederick of the Netherlands, 1797-1881
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the second son of the king of the Netherlands
[7][8]
 
 
Princess Pauline of Orange-Nassau, 1800-1806
 
Princess Marianne of the Netherlands, 1810-1883
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the eldest daughter of the king of the Netherlands
[9]
married Prince Albert of Prussia (1809–1872)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Emma of Waldeck-Pyrmont
 
 
William III, 1817-1890, King of the Netherlands, 1849
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Royal Arms of the Netherlands (1815-1907)
 
Sophia of Württemberg
 
Prince Alexander of the Netherlands, 1818–1848
 
Prince Henry of the Netherlands, "the Navigator" 1820–1879
 
Princess Sophie of the Netherlands, 1824–1897 married Charles Alexander, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach
 
Princess Louise of the Netherlands,1828–1871 married Charles XV of Sweden
 
Princess Marie of the Netherlands, 1841-1910 married William, Prince of Wied one son was William, Prince of Albania
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wilhelmina, 1880-1962, Queen of the Netherlands, 1890-1948
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Royal Arms of the Netherlands (1815-1907)Arms of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
To 1907 after 1907
 
Henry of Mecklenburg-Schwerin 1876-1934, Prince of the Netherlands
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of Hendrik of Mecklenburg-Schwerin
 
William, Prince of Orange 1840-1879
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the Prince of Orange (1815-1884)
 
Prince Maurice of the Netherlands1843-1850
 
Alexander, Prince of Orange, 1851-1884
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the Prince of Orange (1815-1884)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Juliana 1909-2004, Queen of the Netherlands, 1948-1980
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the Kingdom of the NetherlandsArms of Juliana of the Netherlands
 
Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld, Prince of the Netherlands 1911-2004
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beatrix,1938-, Queen of the Netherlands,1980-2013
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the Kingdom of the NetherlandsArms of Beatrix of the Netherlands
 
Claus van Amsberg,1926-2002, Prince of the Netherlands
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of Claus von Amsberg
 
 
Princess Irene of the Netherlands, 1939, m.(1964–1981) Carlos Hugo of Bourbon-Parma, Duke of Parma, 4 children not eligible for throne
 
Princess Margriet of the Netherlands, 1943-
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of Beatrix of the Netherlands
 
Pieter van Vollenhoven
 
Princess Christina of the Netherlands,1947, m. Jorge Pérez y Guillermo (m. 1975; div. 1996), 3 children not eligible for throne
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William-Alexander of the Netherlands,1967-
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the children of Beatrix of the NetherlandsArms of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Prince of Orange & Heir Apparent, 1980, King of the Netherlands, 2013-
 
Queen Maxima of the Netherlands
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of Maxima, Queen of the Netherlands
 
Prince Friso of Orange-Nassau 1968-2013 m.(2004) Mabel Wisse Smit without permission, his children are not eligible for the throne and he was no longer a Prince of the Netherlands after his marriage
 
Prince Constantijn of the Netherlands, 1969-
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the children of Beatrix of the Netherlands
 
Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands
 
 
 
4 sons, 2 of whom were eligible for the throne until Beatrix abdicated in 2013
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the children of Margriet of the Netherlands
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Princess Catharina-Amalia of the Netherlands,2003- Princess of Orange & heiress apparent, 2013-
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the children of Wilhelm-Alexander of the Netherlands
 
Princess Alexia of the Netherlands, 2005-
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the children of Wilhelm-Alexander of the Netherlands
 
Princess Ariane of the Netherlands, 2007-
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Arms of the children of Wilhelm-Alexander of the Netherlands
 
Countess Eloise of Orange-Nassau, 2002-
 
Count Claus-Casimir of Orange-Nassau, 2004-
 
Countess Leonore of Orange-Nassau, 2006-


House of Nassau-WeilburgEdit

Complied from Wikipedia and:[10]

 
 
For ancestors of the
House of Nassau-Weilburg
(House of Nassau family tree)'
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John III
(1441 +1480)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Philippe de Nassau-Sarrebrück (selon Gelre)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Louis I
(1473 +1523)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
 
 
 
 
Philip III
(1504 +1559)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Albert
(1537 +1593)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
Philip IV
(1542 +1602)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
in Saarbrucken
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Philippe de Nassau-Sarrebrück (selon Gelre)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Louis II
(1565 +1627)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
in Ottweiler
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
William
(1570–1597)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
in Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
John Casimir
(1577 +1602)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
in Gleiberg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William Louis
(1590 +1640)
Count of Nassau-Saarbrücken
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Blason Nassau-Weilbourg-Saarbrucken
 
 
 
John
(1603 +1677)
Count of Nassau-Idstein
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
Counts of Nassau-Idstein
ext.1721
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ernest Casimir
(1607 +1655)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John Louis
(1625 +1690)
Count of Nassau-Ottweiler
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
ext. 1728
 
 
Gustav Adolph
(1632 +1677)
Count of Nassau-Saarbrücken
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
ext. 1723
 
 
Walrad
(1635 +1702)
Count & Prince of Nassau-Usingen
Princely crown
ext. 1816
 
 
 
 
Frederick
(1640 +1675)
Count of Nassau-Weilburg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John Ernst
(1664 +1719)
Count & Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles August
(1685 +1753)
Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown
 
 
 
 
Charles Ernst
(1689–1709)
Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles Christian
(1735 +1788)
Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown
 
Princess Carolina of Orange-Nassau
(1743 +1787)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Frederick William
(1768 +1816)
Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
Princely crown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William
(1792 +1839)
Duke of Nassau
Royal Crown of the Netherlands (Heraldic)
Blason Guillaume, duc de Nassau (1816-1839)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adolphe
(1817 +1905)
Duke of Nassau 1839-1866
Grand Duke of Luxembourg
1890-1905
40px40px
CoA Grand Duke of Luxembourg 1890-1898CoA Grand Duke of Luxembourg 1898-2000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg


The Grand-Ducal Family of LuxembourgEdit

Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Grand Duchess Charlotte abdicated in 1964, but she died in 1985
  2. ^ Family tree of the early House of Nassau, retrieved on 2009-01-22.
  3. ^ Table 11, Page 23 and note on page 151, quoted at Genealogy of the Middle Ages, retrieved on 2009-01-23
  4. ^ "Pałac Gozdzkich - de Nassau" (in pl). www.warszawa1939.pl. http://www.warszawa1939.pl/index.php?r1=kopernika_nassau&r3=0. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  5. ^ Louda, Jiri; Maclagan, Michael (December 12, 1988), "Netherlands and Luxembourg, Table 33", Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (1st Ed.(U.S.) edition ed.), Clarkson N. Potter, Inc.; 
  6. ^ "Official Website of the Dutch Royal House". Rijksvoorlichtingsdienst (RVD), The Hague, the Netherlands. http://www.koninklijkhuis.nl/. Retrieved 2013-04-30. 
  7. ^ Rietstap, Johannes Baptist (1875). Handboek der Wapenkunde. the Netherlands: Theod. Bom. p. 348. ""Prins FREDERIK: Het koninklijke wapen, in 't shcildhoofd gebroken door een rooden barensteel, de middelste hanger beladen met een regtopstaanden goud pijl."" 
  8. ^ Junius, J.H. (1894). Heraldiek. the Netherlands: Frederik Muller. p. 151. ""...de tweede oon voert het koninklijk wapen gebroken door een barensteel van drie stukken met een zilveren pijl."" 
  9. ^ Junius, J.H. (1894). Heraldiek. the Netherlands: Frederik Muller. p. 151. ""...is het wapen afgebeeld van de oudste dochter van den Koning der Nederlanden. De barensteel is van keel en beladen met een gouden koningskroon."" 
  10. ^ Louda, Jiri; Maclagan, Michael (December 12, 1988), "Netherlands and Luxembourg, Table 33", Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe (1st Ed.(U.S.) edition ed.), Clarkson N. Potter, Inc.; 

SourcesEdit


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