Main Births etc
Haute-Corse
Corsica suprana / Cismonte
Upper Corsica
—  Department  —
Cismonte

Coat of arms

Logo
Location of Haute-Corse in France
Country France
Region Corsica
Prefecture Bastia
Subprefectures Calvi
Corte
Government
 • President of the General Council François Ravier
Area1
 • Total 4,666 km2 (1,802 sq mi)
Population (2017)
 • Total 177,689
 • Rank 93rd
 • Density 38/km2 (99/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Department number 2B
Arrondissements 3
Cantons 15
Communes 236
^1  French Land Register data, which exclude estuaries, and lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km2

Haute-Corse (French: [ot kɔʁs]  ( listen); Corsican: Corsica suprana Template:IPA-co, Cismonte Template:IPA-co[lower-alpha 1] or Alta Corsica; English: Upper Corsica) is (as of 2019) an administrative department of France, consisting of the northern part of the island of Corsica. The corresponding departmental territorial collectivity merged with that of Corse-du-Sud on 1 January 2018, forming the single territorial collectivity of Corsica, with territorial elections coinciding with the dissolution of the separate councils.[1] However, even though its administrative powers were ceded to the new territorial collectivity, it continues to remain an administrative department in its own right. The people living in the department are called Supranacci.

History[edit | edit source]

Map of Haute-Corse

The department was formed on 1 January 1976, when the department of Corsica was divided into Upper Corsica (Haute-Corse) and Southern Corsica (Corse-du-Sud). The department corresponds exactly to the former department of Golo, which existed between 1793 and 1811.

On 6 July 2003, a referendum on increased autonomy was voted down by a very thin majority: 50.98 percent against to 49.02 percent for. This was a major setback for French Minister of the Interior Nicolas Sarkozy, who had hoped to use Corsica as the first step in his decentralization policies.

On 1 January 2018, Haute Corse's administrative powers were abandoned and were ceded to the new territorial collectivity of Corsica.

Geography[edit | edit source]

The department was surrounded on three sides by the Mediterranean Sea and on the south by the department of Corse-du-Sud.

Politics[edit | edit source]

Current National Assembly representatives[edit | edit source]

Constituency Member[2] Party
style="background-color: Template:Pè a Corsica/meta/color" | Haute-Corse's 1st constituency Michel Castellani Pè a Corsica
style="background-color: Template:Pè a Corsica/meta/color" | Haute-Corse's 2nd constituency Jean-Félix Acquaviva Pè a Corsica

Tourism[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. ^ Also Italian: [tʃiˈzmonte].

References[edit | edit source]

External links[edit | edit source]


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Haute-Corse. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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