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Greenville County, South Carolina
Old Greenville County Courthouse 2017.jpg
Former Greenville County Courthouse (now a bookstore and office space)
Map of South Carolina highlighting Greenville County
Location in the state of South Carolina
Map of the U.S. highlighting South Carolina
South Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded March 22, 1786
Seat Greenville
Largest city Greenville
Largest city Greenville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

795 sq mi (2,059 km²)
785 sq mi (2,033 km²)
9.7 sq mi (25 km²), 1.2%
Population
 -  Density


Congressional districts 3rd, 4th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.greenvillecounty.org

Official logo of Greenville County

Greenville County is located in the state of South Carolina, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 451,225,[1] making it the most populous county in the state. In 2019, the estimated population of the county was 523,542. Its county seat is Greenville.[2] The county is also home to the Greenville County School District, the largest school system in South Carolina. County government is headquartered at Greenville County Square.

Greenville County is the most populous county in Upstate South Carolina, as well as in the State of South Carolina. It is the central county of the Greenville-Anderson, SC Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn is part of the Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Combined Statistical Area.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 795 square miles (2,060 km2), of which 785 square miles (2,030 km2) is land and 9.7 square miles (25 km2) (1.2%) is water.[3]

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 6,503
1800 11,504 76.9%
1810 13,133 14.2%
1820 14,530 10.6%
1830 16,476 13.4%
1840 17,839 8.3%
1850 20,156 13.0%
1860 21,892 8.6%
1870 22,262 1.7%
1880 37,496 68.4%
1890 44,310 18.2%
1900 53,490 20.7%
1910 68,377 27.8%
1920 88,498 29.4%
1930 117,009 32.2%
1940 136,580 16.7%
1950 168,152 23.1%
1960 209,776 24.8%
1970 240,546 14.7%
1980 287,913 19.7%
1990 320,167 11.2%
2000 379,616 18.6%
2010 451,225 18.9%
Est. 2020 532,486 [4] 40.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790–1960[6] 1900–1990[7]
1990–2000[8] 2010–2015[9]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 451,225 people, 176,531 households, and 119,362 families residing in the county.[10] The population density was 574.7 inhabitants per square mile (221.9 /km2). There were 195,462 housing units at an average density of 249.0 per square mile (96.1 /km2).[11] The racial makeup of the county was 73.8% white, 18.1% black or African American, 2.0% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 3.9% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 8.1% of the population.[10] In terms of ancestry, 13.0% were American, 11.6% were German, 10.9% were English, and 10.7% were Irish.[12]

Of the 176,531 households, 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.4% were non-families, and 27.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.03. The median age was 37.2 years.[10]

The median income for a household in the county was $46,830 and the median income for a family was $59,043. Males had a median income of $45,752 versus $33,429 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,931. About 10.8% of families and 14.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.0% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over.[13]

Greenville County Racial Breakdown of Population[14]
Racial composition 2010 2019
White 73.8% 76.3%
Black 18.1% 18.4%
Asian 2.0% 2.7%
Native American 0.3% 0.5%
Native Hawaiian and
other Pacific Islander
0.1% 0.1%
Two or more races 1.9% 2.0%
Other 3.8% 0.0%

2016[]

As of 2016 the largest self-reported ancestry groups in Greenville County, South Carolina are:[15]

Largest ancestries (2016) Percent
English 12.9%
German 11.0%
Irish 10.2%
American 9.9%
Scots-Irish 3.1%
Italian 3.1%
Scottish 2.9%
French 2.2%
Polish 1.5%
Dutch 1.2%
Welsh 0.7%
Swedish 0.7%
Norwegian 0.6%

Economy[]

CommunityWorks Federal Credit Union was chartered in 2014 to serve the residents of Greenville County. It is sponsored by CommunityWorks, Inc., a non-profit community development financial institution, and receives assistance from the United Way of Greenville County and the Hollingsworth Fund.[16]

Communities[]

The 2010 Census lists six cities and 16 census designated places that are fully or partially within Greenville County.[17]

Cities[]

Census-designated places[]

  • Berea
  • Caesars Head
  • City View
  • Conestee
  • Dunean
  • Five Forks
  • Gantt
  • Golden Grove
  • Judson
  • Parker
  • Piedmont (partly in Anderson County)
  • Sans Souci
  • Slater-Marietta
  • Taylors
  • The Cliffs Valley
  • Tigerville
  • Wade Hampton
  • Ware Place
  • Welcome

Other unincorporated communities[]

  • Batesville
  • Cleveland

Government and politics[]

Greenville County is governed by a 12-member county council. The current county administrator is Joseph Kernell, whom the council appointed in January 2004 after voting in late 2003 to hire him. Kernell was previously the county administrator for St. Charles County, Missouri. Other staff hired by the council include a clerk and an attorney.[18][19]

Council members are elected by voters in each of the twelve state legislative districts (17–28) within the county and serve staggered four-year terms.[20]

County Council members[20]
District Name/party[21][22] Home[23] Elected
17 Dill, JoeJoe Dill Landrum 1998[24]
18 Barnes, Michael F.Michael F. Barnes Greer 2016[25][26]
19 Meadows, WillisWillis Meadows (chair) Greenville 2006[27]
20 Shaw, SteveSteve Shaw Travelers Rest 2020[28]
21 Harrison, ChrisChris Harrison Greer 2020[28]
22 Tzouvelekas, StanStan Tzouvelekas Greenville 2020[28]
23 Norris, XantheneXanthene Norris (chair pro tem) Greenville 1997[29]
24 Seman, LizLiz Seman Greenville 2008[30]
25 Fant Jr, Ennis M.Ennis M. Fant Jr Greenville 2016[31] (1984)[32]
26 Ballard, LynnLynn Ballard Pelzer 2014[33]
27 Kirven, ButchButch Kirven Simpsonville 2004[34]
28 Tripp, DanDan Tripp (vice chair) Mauldin 2018[35]
United States presidential election results for Greenville County, South Carolina[36]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 150,021 58.11% 103,030 39.91% 5,104 1.98%
2016 127,832 59.41% 74,483 34.62% 12,850 5.97%
2012 121,685 62.99% 68,070 35.23% 3,434 1.78%
2008 116,363 61.03% 70,886 37.18% 3,408 1.79%
2004 111,481 66.03% 55,347 32.78% 2,005 1.19%
2000 92,714 66.09% 43,810 31.23% 3,769 2.69%
1996 71,210 59.13% 41,605 34.55% 7,605 6.32%
1992 65,066 57.12% 34,651 30.42% 14,190 12.46%
1988 67,371 70.82% 27,188 28.58% 567 0.60%
1984 66,766 73.07% 24,137 26.42% 466 0.51%
1980 46,168 57.41% 32,135 39.96% 2,112 2.63%
1976 39,099 51.46% 35,943 47.31% 939 1.24%
1972 46,360 79.62% 10,143 17.42% 1,726 2.96%
1968 31,652 52.91% 12,928 21.61% 15,241 25.48%
1964 29,358 62.96% 17,275 37.04% 0 0.00%
1960 22,657 61.85% 13,976 38.15% 0 0.00%
1956 10,752 39.54% 11,819 43.46% 4,622 17.00%
1952 17,743 54.42% 14,863 45.58% 0 0.00%
1948 789 8.33% 2,745 28.97% 5,940 62.70%
1944 711 8.78% 7,107 87.81% 276 3.41%
1940 514 5.95% 8,118 94.05% 0 0.00%
1936 92 1.09% 8,310 98.91% 0 0.00%
1932 126 1.56% 7,930 98.41% 2 0.02%
1928 546 11.71% 4,116 88.25% 2 0.04%
1924 59 1.54% 3,728 97.36% 42 1.10%
1920 144 3.16% 4,409 96.84% 0 0.00%
1916 81 2.31% 3,384 96.66% 36 1.03%
1912 0 0.00% 3,140 98.28% 55 1.72%
1908 176 5.90% 2,774 92.93% 35 1.17%
1904 66 2.58% 2,489 97.42% 0 0.00%
1900 47 2.58% 1,777 97.42% 0 0.00%
1896 288 9.47% 2,718 89.38% 35 1.15%
1892 600 16.28% 3,026 82.09% 60 1.63%



From the latter half of the 20th century onward, Greenville County has voted overwhelmingly Republican in presidential elections. It has gone Republican in every presidential election since 1960, and in all but one election since 1952. Even Jimmy Carter of neighboring Georgia failed to win the county in 1976 despite winning the state. To date, Carter's two runs are the last times that a Democrat has managed even 40 percent of the county's vote, and one of only two official Democratic candidates to do so since 1948. In 2020, Joe Biden became the first Democrat to obtain over 100,000 votes in the county, and Donald Trump's 18.2 percent margin of victory was the lowest for any Republican since 1980. Biden came within a few votes of being only the second Democrat in 72 years to win 40 percent of the county's vote.

The county also rejects Democrats at the state level; it was one of the first areas of the state where Republicans were able to break the long Democratic monopoly on state and local offices.

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Greenville County, South Carolina

References[]

  1. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/45/45045.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_45.txt. 
  4. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/technical-documentation/research/evaluation-estimates/2020-evaluation-estimates/2010s-counties-total.html. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  7. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/sc190090.txt. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  9. ^ "Greenville County, South Carolina". US Census. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/45/45045.html. 
  10. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US45045. 
  11. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US45045. 
  12. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US45045. 
  13. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US45045. 
  14. ^ "Greenville County, South Carolina". Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/PST045215/45045. 
  15. ^ "Archived copy". https://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/16_5YR/DP02/0500000US45045. 
  16. ^ Birch, Ray (April 3, 2014). "CommunityWorks FCU Is First New CU Charter Of The Year". Credit Union Journal. http://www.cujournal.com/news/communityworks-fcu-is-first-new-cu-charter-of-the-year-1022397-1.html?ET=cujournal%3Ae95261%3Aa%3A&st=email. 
  17. ^ See http://factfinder.census.gov Script error: No such module "webarchive". [1] [2] for population numbers and for municipality and CDP lists in the 2010 Census.
  18. ^ Mitchell, Anna B. (January 30, 2019). "Greenville County Council wants to review county administrator's $280K annual contract". https://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/money/2019/01/30/greenville-county-ems-crisis-council-members-demand-transparency/2703803002/. 
  19. ^ "County Administrator". https://www.greenvillecounty.org/Administrator/. 
  20. ^ a b "County Council". https://www.greenvillecounty.org/Council/. 
  21. ^ "Candidate filing for November 2020". June 25, 2020. https://www.greenvillecounty.org/VoterRegistration/pdf/2020Candidatefile.pdf. 
  22. ^ "Record absentee votes recorded as polls open today". Greer Today. November 6, 2018. http://greertoday.com/greer-sc/record-absentee-votes-recorded-as-polls-open-today/2018/11/06/. 
  23. ^ "County Council Member Information". https://www.greenvillecounty.org/Council/ContactInfo.aspx. 
  24. ^ "Joe Dill, District 17". https://www.greenvillecounty.org/Council/CouncilMember.aspx?m=JoeDill. "originally elected to office in November 1998" 
  25. ^ Coyne, Amanda (May 29, 2016). "Three Greenville County Council districts headed to primary elections". The Greenville News. https://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/news/politics/elections/2016/05/29/three-greenville-county-council-districts-headed-primary-elections/84985406/. "Barnes will face off in a rematch of the 2012 Republican primary. In that race, Barnes won the election but was later kicked off the ballot" 
  26. ^ Coyne, Amanda (November 9, 2016). "Greenville County Council incumbents, primary victors win". The Greenville News. https://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/news/2016/11/08/greenville-county-council-incumbents-primary-victors-win/93484236/. "Mike Barnes ... was also unopposed after winning his primary in June" 
  27. ^ "Willis Meadows, District 19". https://www.greenvillecounty.org/Council/CouncilMember.aspx?m=WillisMeadows. "Elected in November 2006" 
  28. ^ a b c Maxwell, Anne (January 5, 2021). "Willis Meadows elected chair of Greenville County Council". WSPA-TV. https://www.wspa.com/news/local-news/willis-meadows-elected-chair-of-greenville-county-council/. 
  29. ^ "Xanthene Norris, Chairman Pro Tem, District 23". https://www.greenvillecounty.org/Council/CouncilMember.aspx?m=XantheneNorris. "elected for five terms since 1997" 
  30. ^ "Liz Seman, District 24". https://www.greenvillecounty.org/Council/CouncilMember.aspx?m=LizSeman. "first elected in 2008 to represent District 24" 
  31. ^ "Greenville County SC Councilman In Hot Water Over Taxes". FITSNews. May 17, 2019. https://www.fitsnews.com/2019/05/17/greenville-county-sc-councilman-in-hot-water-over-taxes/. "since returning to public life in 2016" 
  32. ^ Coyne, Amanda (May 29, 2016). "Three Greenville County Council districts headed to primary elections". The Greenville News. https://eu.greenvilleonline.com/story/news/politics/elections/2016/05/29/three-greenville-county-council-districts-headed-primary-elections/84985406/. "Fant served on Greenville County Council from 1984 to 1988" 
  33. ^ Welch, Stan (August 20, 2014). "Piedmont Public Service District report". The Journal (Piedmont, South Carolina). http://thejournalonline.com/2014/08/20/piedmont-public-service-district-report/. "Newly elected Greenville County Councilman Lynn Ballard" 
  34. ^ Cary, Nathaniel (October 7, 2020). "Greenville County Council candidate accuses council of mishandling coronavirus pandemic". The Post and Courier (Greenville). https://www.postandcourier.com/greenville/business/greenville-county-council-candidate-accuses-council-of-mishandling-coronavirus-pandemic/article_e44657b6-0903-11eb-a78b-97397cad5155.html. "Kirven ... has served on the council since 2004" 
  35. ^ "Dan Tripp, District 28". Greenville County, South Carolina. https://www.greenvillecounty.org/Council/CouncilMember.aspx?m=DanTripp. "Tripp was elected in November of 2018" 
  36. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

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Coordinates: 34°53′N 82°22′W / 34.89, -82.37

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