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Boris Konstantinovich of Gorodets, Prince of Gorodets, was born 1325 to Konstantin Vasilyevich of Suzdal (c1300-1355) and died 1394 Suzdal, Suzdal Rayon, Vladimir Oblast, Russia of unspecified causes. Charlemagne (747-814)/s.

Boris Konstantinovich The Prince of the City The Grand Duke of Suzdal-Nizhny Novgorod since 1365 Predecessor: Andrei Konstantinovich Successor: Dmitry Konstantinovich July 5, 1383 - 1394 Predecessor: Dmitry Konstantinovich Successor: Daniil Borisovich

Death: 1394 Suzdal Sort by: Rurikovichi Father: Konstantin Vasilievich Spouse: Agrippina Olgerdovna Children: Daniel , Ivan Commons-logo.svg Boris Konstantinovich on Wikimedia Commons Boris Konstantinovich (died 1394) -Prince of Gorodets, the third son of Konstantin Vasilyevich , Grand Prince of Suzdal-Nizhny Novgorod.

The struggle for the throne of Nizhny Novgorod

Dying, Konstantin Vasilyevich left the Principality of Nizhny Novgorod to Andrei, the Principality of Suzdal to Dmitri and the Principality of Gorodets to Boris.

In 1365 Andrei died childless, and his fate was desired by Boris, who in fact had been in charge of it since 1363. Dmitri, who by right of seniority was to inherit the throne of Nizhny Novgorod, was compelled to turn to the help of the Moscow prince Dmitri Ivanovich, who sent Metropolitan Aleksi to peacefully settle the dispute with his brother, but Boris did not listen. in the same year, Boris Konstantinovich received a khan's jarlig for rule of Nizhny Novgorod "from Tsar Barakhomza," and Dmitri, having received a [jarlig]] for the rule of Vladimir, yielded to Dmitri Ivanovich, who sent to Boris his ambassadors-reconciliators, among whom Sergius of Radonezh, - with a proposal to come to Moscow; Boris refused. Then Sergius, on the orders of the Metropolitan and Grand Prince, closed all the churches in Nizhny Novgorod; but this measure did not help either. After that, regiments were sent from Moscow to help Dmitri, and when the latter approached them and with his army to Nizhny Novgorod, Boris came out to meet him and began to ask for peace, retreating from Nizhny Novgorod. Peace was given to him, and since that time Boris did not violate the agreement established between him and his brother and was a loyal ally of the Grand Prince: in 1367, together with Dmitri, his brother, fought against the Mongolian Murza Bulat Temir, who plundered their lands; in 1370, at the request of his brother, went to Asan, the king of the Bulgarians; in 1375 he helped Dmitri Ivanovich in his struggle with the Prince of Tver and in 1377 and 1378 he became famous for victories over the Mordovians, who robbed the fate of his brother and burned down Nizhny Novgorod.

In 1383, Dmitri Konstantinovich, the Prince of Suzdal-Nizhegorodsky, died. Boris at this time was in the horde of Tokhtamysh and managed to get him a jarlig for Nizhny Novgorod. The sons of Dmitri, Semyon and Vasily-Kirdyapa, were expected to be satisfied with Suzdal; however they were extremely discontent and on their return from the Horde with the help of the Grand Prince they began a war with their uncle for Nizhny Novgorod and even Gorodets, to which they received a jarlig from the khan; but soon reconciled, losing to Boris Gorodets.

Returning to Gorodets, Boris nevertheless did not leave his mind to take over Lower. After the death of Dmitri Donskoy in 1389, he went to the Horde to work on the Nizhny Novgorod principality. Not having found Tokhtamysh in the Horde, who went to the borders of Persia to fight Tamerlane, he caught up with him on the way, spent more than a month wandering with him and, finally, returned with a jarlig from Khan to Nizhny (1390). However, in 1392 Vasili Dmitrievich, Grand Duke of Moscow, along with other parcels received a jarlig from Khan and to the principality of Nizhny Novgorod. In the same year, on his return from the Horde, he sent to the Nizhny Ambassadors, whom the boyars of Nizhny Novgorod, who did not like Boris, betrayed the city, declaring to the people that he now belongs to the Moscow prince, and Boris with his wife and children in fetters, on the orders of Basil I, was taken by different cities.

In 1393 (according to other sources, May 12, 1394), Boris died in Suzdal; was buried in Christmas-Bogoroditsky Cathedral.

Cultural activities

Boris Konstantinovich is also known as a builder: in 1372, in the form of a stronghold from the raids of the Mordvins, Cheremis and Tatars founded the city of Kurmysh on the river. Sure, and three years before that he put in the city a cathedral church in honor of the Archangel Michael (1369).

Family

Boris Konstantinovich was married to the daughter of the Lithuanian prince Algirdas (1296-1377), Agrippina, and had from her two sons: Daniil + Ivan, who in 1412 managed to get a jarlig from Zeleny-Saltan, khan of Kipchak, for Nizhny Novgorod; but they did not stay long: in 1417, they were in Moscow, from where, the next year, they fled back to Nizhny. Here in the same year Ivan died, and soon after him, probably, Daniil.

The chronicle records for 1396 a report about the death of his daughter, whose husband was Ivan Vsevolodovich (Prince of Kholm) .

Literature

  • Рудаков В. Е. - Борис Константинович - ВТ-ЭСБЕ
  • Сербов Н. - Суздальские и Суздальско-Нижегородские удельные князья| - ВТ-РБС



Children



Offspring of Boris Konstantinovich of Gorodets and Agrippina Olgierdovna (c1342-1393)
Name Birth Death Joined with
Daniil Borisovich of Suzdal-Nizhny Novgorod (c1365-c1429)
Ivan Borisovich Tugoy Luk of Suzdal-Nizhny Novgorod (c1370-1418)
NN Borisovna of Suzdal-Nizhny Novgorod (c1372-1396)










Siblings

Residences

Boris Konstantinovich of Gorodets (c1325-1394)
Born: c1325 Died: 1394
Preceded by
Yaroslav Vsevolodovich
Prince of Gorodets
13651365
Succeeded by
Mikhail Vsevolodovich
Preceded by
Andrei Konstantinovich
Grand Prince of Suzdal-Nizhny Novgorod
13651365
Succeeded by
Dmitri Konstantinovich of Suzdal (1322-1383)Dmitri Konstantinovich
Preceded by
Dmitri Konstantinovich of Suzdal (1322-1383)Dmitri Konstantinovich
Grand Prince of Suzdal-Nizhny Novgorod
5 Jul 1383c1429
Succeeded by
Daniil Borisovich


Footnotes (including sources)

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