Familypedia
Advertisement
This article is based on the corresponding article in another wiki. For Familypedia purposes, it requires significantly more historical detail on phases of this location's development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there. Also desirable are links to organizations that may be repositories of genealogical information..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can.


Abbeville County, South Carolina
Abbevillecourt01-1000.jpg
Abbeville County Courthouse
Map of South Carolina highlighting Abbeville County
Location in the state of South Carolina
Map of the U.S. highlighting South Carolina
South Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded 1785
Named for Abbeville, France
Seat Abbeville
Largest city Abbeville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

511 sq mi (1,323 km²)
490 sq mi (1,269 km²)
21 sq mi (54 km²), 4.0%
Population
 - (2010)
 - Density

25,417
52/sq mi (20/km²)
Congressional district 3rd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.abbevillecountysc.com

Abbeville County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2010 census, its population was 25,417.[1] Its county seat is Abbeville.[2] It is the first county in the United States alphabetically.

Abbeville County is included in the Greenwood, SC Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson, SC Combined Statistical Area.

History[]

Both Abbeville County and the county seat, Abbeville, SC, get their name from the town of Abbeville, France.[3] The county was originally part of Ninety-Six District, South Carolina, but was designated Abbeville County in 1785, with parts of the county later going to the creation of the counties of Greenwood and McCormick.[3] Abbeville County was settled by mostly Scotch Irish and French-Huguenot farmers in the mid-18th century.[3]

  • There was a historic treaty with the Cherokee Indians that was signed in Dewitt's Corner, which is now known as Due West.[3]
  • Abbeville County was a hotbed of secession before the Civil War and was also where the last Confederate council of war was held[3]

In 1950 Abbeville County had a population of 22,456.[4]

Bryan McClain is the chairman of the Abbeville County Council, who also represents District 7.[5] The other members and their districts are as following:

  • Charlie Stone- District 1[5]
  • John Calhoun- District 2[5]
  • Claude Thomas- District 3[5]
  • William Norris- District 4[5]
  • Oscar Klugh- District 5[5]
  • Don Campbell- District 6[5]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 511 square miles (1,320 km2), of which 490 square miles (1,300 km2) is land and 21 square miles (54 km2) (4.0%) is water.[6] Abbeville County is in the Savannah River basin and the Saluda River basin.

Adjacent counties[]

Major highways[]

  • US 178.svg US 178
  • South Carolina 20.svg SC 20
  • South Carolina 28.svg SC 28
  • South Carolina 72.svg SC 72
  • South Carolina 81.svg SC 81
  • South Carolina 184.svg SC 184
  • South Carolina 185.svg SC 185
  • South Carolina 284.svg SC 284

National protected area[]

  • Sumter National Forest (part)

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 9,197
1800 13,553 47.4%
1810 21,156 56.1%
1820 23,167 9.5%
1830 28,149 21.5%
1840 29,351 4.3%
1850 32,318 10.1%
1860 32,385 0.2%
1870 31,129 −3.9%
1880 40,815 31.1%
1890 46,854 14.8%
1900 33,400 −28.7%
1910 34,804 4.2%
1920 27,139 −22.0%
1930 23,323 −14.1%
1940 22,931 −1.7%
1950 22,456 −2.1%
1960 21,417 −4.6%
1970 21,112 −1.4%
1980 22,627 7.2%
1990 23,862 5.5%
2000 26,167 9.7%
2010 25,417 −2.9%
Est. 2015 24,932 [7] −4.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2013[1]

2000 census[]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 26,167 people, 10,131 households, and 7,284 families residing in the county. The population density was 52 people per square mile (20/km²). There were 11,656 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 68.33% White, 30.29% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.31% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. 0.83% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 22.1% were of American, 9.7% Irish, 6.7% English, 5.5% German and 5.3% Scotch-Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 10,131 households out of which 31.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.20% were married couples living together, 15.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.10% were non-families. 25.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.30% under the age of 18, 9.50% from 18 to 24, 26.70% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, and 14.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 92.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,635, and the median income for a family was $38,847. Males had a median income of $30,452 versus $21,045 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,370. About 10.10% of families and 13.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.20% of those under age 18 and 16.90% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 25,417 people, 9,990 households, and 6,939 families residing in the county.[13] The population density was 51.8 inhabitants per square mile (20.0 /km2). There were 12,079 housing units at an average density of 24.6 per square mile (9.5 /km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 69.6% white, 28.3% black or African American, 0.3% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.0% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 14.7% were American, 10.9% were Irish, 9.7% were English, 7.6% were German, and 5.6% were Scotch-Irish.[15]

Of the 9,990 households, 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 15.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.5% were non-families, and 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.98. The median age was 41.6 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $33,143 and the median income for a family was $45,147. Males had a median income of $39,217 versus $29,199 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,653. About 16.3% of families and 20.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.8% of those under age 18 and 16.2% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Education[]

Unified school districts[]

All of Abbeville County schools fall into one district where the district superintendent is Dr. Ivan Randolph.[17] The following schools are within the district:

  • Abbeville County Adult Education[17]
  • Abbeville High School(9-12)[17]
  • Abbeville County Career Center(10-12)[17]
  • Cherokee Trail Elementary(K-7)[17]
  • Diamond Hill Elementary(K-7)[17]
  • Dixie High School(8-12)[17]
  • John C. Calhoun Elementary(K-5)[17]
  • Long Cane Primary(K-2)[17]
  • Westwood Elementary(3-5)[17]
  • Wright Middle School(6-8)[17]

Other school districts[]

  • Calhoun Falls Charter School (this school is a part of the South Carolina Public Charter School district, but still associates itself with the Abbeville County School district)

Colleges and universities[]

  • Erskine College, a four-year Christian liberal arts college, with 575 undergraduates, is located in Due West, South Carolina
  • Piedmont Technical College, in Abbeville, SC

Communities[]

City[]

Towns[]

Name Area (sq. mi.) Population (2010) Population density (per sq. mi.)
Calhoun Falls 3.475 2,004 577
Donalds 0.8375 348 416
Due West 1.641 1,247 760
Honea Path (Mostly in Anderson County) 3.629 3,597 991
Lowndesville 0.771875 128 166
Ware Shoals (Mostly in Greenwood County; partly in Laurens County) 4.015 2,170 540

Unincorporated communities[]

Name Area (sq. mi.) Population (2010) Population density (per sq. mi.)
Antreville 3.896 140 36
Lake Secession 7.22 1,083 150

Notable residents[]

Portrait of John C. Calhoun, famous politician from Abbeville County.

  • John C. Calhoun, (1782–1850), born in the Abbeville District, United States Congressman and United States Senator from South Carolina, Secretary of War, Secretary of State, and Vice President of the United States [18]
  • Langdon Cheves, (1776–1857), born in Abbeville County at Rocky River, banker and United States Congressman from South Carolina[18]
  • Francis Alanson Cunningham, (1804–1864), born in the Abbeville District, physician and United States Congressman from Ohio [18]
  • Joshua Hill, (1812–1891), born in the Abbeville District, United States Senator from Georgia [18]
  • Abner Smith Lipscomb, (1816–1890), born in the Abbeville District, member of the Alabama Legislature and Supreme Court Justice of both Alabama and Texas.[18]
  • James L. Petigru, (1789–1863), born in the Abbeville District, was the attorney general of South Carolina and a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives. He was the leader of the anti-nullificationalists in the state house.[18]
  • Thomas D. Howie, (1908-1944), was an American army officer, killed during the Battle of Normandy during World War II, while trying to capture the French town of Saint-Lô. He is known as "The Major of St. Lo".

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Abbeville County, South Carolina
  • Russell Lake

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/45/45001.html. Retrieved November 22, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Mary Morgan (2007-03-19). "Abbeville County". Archived from the original on 2007-08-20. http://web.archive.org/web/20070820050437/http://www.statelibrary.sc.gov/abbeville-county.html. Retrieved 2007-10-15. 
  4. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica Atlas, 1959 Edition, p. 298
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "County Council". http://www.abbevillecountysc.com/council.aspx. Retrieved 2011-11-10. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_45.txt. Retrieved March 15, 2015. 
  7. ^ "County Totals Dataset: Population, Population Change and Estimated Components of Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". http://www.census.gov/popest/data/counties/totals/2015/CO-EST2015-alldata.html. Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. Retrieved March 15, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. Retrieved March 15, 2015. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/sc190090.txt. Retrieved March 15, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. Retrieved March 15, 2015. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder2.census.gov. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US45001. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US45001. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US45001. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US45001. Retrieved 2016-03-09. 
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Abbeville County School District Listing". http://www.acsd.k12.sc.us/schools.html. Retrieved 2011-11-10. 
  18. ^ a b c d e f Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 34°14′N 82°27′W / 34.23, -82.45


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Abbeville County, South Carolina. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Advertisement